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The (New) OECD Jobs Study: Introduction and Assessment

In 1994, the OECD presented the Jobs Study analyzing the causes of high unemployment in Europe. The study identified inappropriate labor market regulations and legislation as a key determinant of high unemployment. The OECD recommended deregulation and liberalization of labor market institutions as a remedy. Meanwhile, new empirical research has explored the influence of labor market institutions on unemployment and has only partly confirmed the recommendations of the Jobs Study. In a reevaluation, the OECD now concludes that different combinations of institutions may foster good labor market performance. Like the Scandinavian countries, Austria is a country with strong labor market institutions and low unemployment.

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File URL: http://www.oenb.at/dms/oenb/Publikationen/Volkswirtschaft/Monetary-Policy-and-the-Economy/2006/Monetary-Policy-and-the-Economy-Q3-06/chapters/mop_2006_3_stiglbauer_tcm16-48472.pdf
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Article provided by Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank) in its journal Monetary Policy & the Economy.

Volume (Year): (2006)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 58–74

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Handle: RePEc:onb:oenbmp:y:2006:i:3:b:4
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