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Achieving political acceptability for new transport infrastructure in congested urban regions

Author

Listed:
  • Westin , Jonas

    () (KTH)

  • Basck, Pierre

    (LET, Université de Lyon)

  • Franklin, Joel P.

    () (KTH)

  • Proost , Stef

    (CES, KU Leuven)

  • Raux , Charles

    (LET, Université de Lyon)

Abstract

The paper analyzes the political acceptability of policies targeted at relieving urban congestion. The paper combines a stylized model of an urban transport network with a somewhat more detailed model of the political process that incorporates interactions between voters, special interest groups and politicians to explore the possibilities to reach political acceptability for efficient transport policies. In a case study of a proposed bypass in Lyon, France, the paper compares a set of potential policies in terms of efficiency, equity and political acceptability. A possible explanation for the difficulty of achieving political support for efficient transport policies is that since urban road pricing policies are characterized by conflicting interest, the political decision making process must balance different interests against each other to reach an efficient outcome. The analysis suggest that the difficulty to achieve political support for efficient road pricing policies is not a lack of political acceptability; instead the difficulty arises because of low political feasibility for efficient transport pricing since non-efficient transport policies are seen as more attractive to the decision makers.

Suggested Citation

  • Westin , Jonas & Basck, Pierre & Franklin, Joel P. & Proost , Stef & Raux , Charles, 2012. "Achieving political acceptability for new transport infrastructure in congested urban regions," Working papers in Transport Economics 2012:19, CTS - Centre for Transport Studies Stockholm (KTH and VTI).
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:ctswps:2012_019
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    File URL: http://www.transportportal.se/SWoPEc/CTS2012-19.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Harsman, Bjorn & Quigley, John M., 2010. "Political and Public Acceptability of Congestion Pricing: Ideology and Self Interest," Berkeley Program on Housing and Urban Policy, Working Paper Series qt77b5243v, Berkeley Program on Housing and Urban Policy.
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    3. Jonas Westin & Joel P. Franklin & Sofia Grahn-Voorneveld & Stef Proost, 2012. "How to decide on regional infrastructure to achieve intra-regional acceptability and inter-regional consensus?," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 91(3), pages 617-643, August.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    User charges; Political economy; Transport infrastructure; Welfare effects; Acceptability of transport pricing;

    JEL classification:

    • H76 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - Other Expenditure Categories
    • R42 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Government and Private Investment Analysis; Road Maintenance; Transportation Planning
    • R48 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Government Pricing and Policy
    • R48 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Government Pricing and Policy
    • R53 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Regional Government Analysis - - - Public Facility Location Analysis; Public Investment and Capital Stock

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