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Marginal tax reform, externalities and income distribution

  • Mayeres, Inge
  • Proost, Stef

The paper examines welfare improving and revenue neutral directions marginal policy reforms for an economy with nonidentical individuals and an externality that has a feedback effect on the consumption of taxed goods. It considers three types of policy instruments: the indirect taxes, the uniform poll transfer and public abatement. This extends the framework set up by Ahmad and Stern (1984), Bovenberg and de Mooij (1994) and Schöb (1996). The theoretical model is illustrated for a specific externality, namely congestion caused by peak car transport.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Public Economics.

Volume (Year): 79 (2001)
Issue (Month): 2 (February)
Pages: 343-363

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Handle: RePEc:eee:pubeco:v:79:y:2001:i:2:p:343-363
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  1. Lawrence Goulder, 1995. "Environmental taxation and the double dividend: A reader's guide," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer, vol. 2(2), pages 157-183, August.
  2. Bovenberg, A Lans & de Mooij, Ruud A, 1997. "Environmental Levies and Distortionary Taxation: Reply," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(1), pages 252-53, March.
  3. Ahmad, Ehtisham & Stern, Nicholas, 1984. "The theory of reform and indian indirect taxes," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 259-298, December.
  4. Bovenberg, A.L. & van der Ploeg, F., 1992. "Environmental policy, public finance and the labour market in a second-best world," Discussion Paper 1992-43, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
  5. Van de gaer, Dirk & Schokkaert, Erik & De Bruyne, Guido, 1992. "Marginal Tax Reform in Different Macroeconomic Regimes," Public Finance = Finances publiques, , vol. 47(Supplemen), pages 256-70.
  6. Schob, Ronnie, 1996. "Evaluating Tax Reforms in the Presence of Externalities," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 48(4), pages 537-55, October.
  7. Guesnerie, Roger, 1977. "On the direction of tax reform," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(2), pages 179-202, April.
  8. Bovenberg, A.L. & de Mooij, R.A., 1994. "Environmental levies and distortionary taxation," Other publications TiSEM 4b32deaa-ec2f-4de7-b59b-9, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
  9. S. Proost & D. Regemorter, 1995. "The double dividend and the role of inequality aversion and macroeconomic regimes," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer, vol. 2(2), pages 207-219, August.
  10. Small, Kenneth A., 1983. "The incidence of congestion tolls on urban highways," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 90-111, January.
  11. Mayeres, Inge & Proost, Stef, 1997. " Optimal Tax and Public Investment Rules for Congestion Type of Externalities," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 99(2), pages 261-79, June.
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