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Managing future oil revenues in Ghana: An assessment of alternative allocation options

Author

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  • Breisinger, Clemens
  • Diao, Xinshen
  • Schweickert, Rainer
  • Wiebelt, Manfred

Abstract

"Contemporary policy debates on the macroeconomics of resource booms often concentrate on the short-run Dutch disease effects of public expenditure, ignoring the possible long-term effects of alternative revenue-allocation options and the supply-side impact of royalty-financed public investments. In a simple model applied here, the government decides the level and timing of resource-rent spending. This model also considers productivity spillovers over time, which may exhibit a sector bias toward domestic production or exports. A dynamic computable general equilibrium (DCGE) model is used to simulate the effect of temporary oil revenue inflows to Ghana. The simulations show that beyond the short-run Dutch disease effects, the relationship between windfall profits, growth, and households' welfare is less straightforward than what the simple model of the “resource curse” suggests. The DCGE model results suggest that designing a rule that allocates oil revenues to both productivity-enhancing investments and an oil fund is crucial to achieving shared growth and macroeconomic stability." from authors' abstract

Suggested Citation

  • Breisinger, Clemens & Diao, Xinshen & Schweickert, Rainer & Wiebelt, Manfred, 2009. "Managing future oil revenues in Ghana: An assessment of alternative allocation options," IFPRI discussion papers 893, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:893
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Christopher Adam & Stephen O'Connell & Edward Buffie & Catherine Pattillo, 2009. "Monetary Policy Rules for Managing Aid Surges in Africa," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 13(s1), pages 464-490, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Asongu, Simplice & Kodila-Tedika, Oasis, 2015. "Is Poverty in the African DNA (Gene)?," MPRA Paper 67849, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Sulser, T. B., 2009. "Green and blue water accounting in the Limpopo and Nile basins: implications for food and agricultural policy," IWMI Working Papers H042476, International Water Management Institute.
    3. Estrades, Carmen & Llambí, Cecilia & Perera, Marcelo & Rovira, Flavia, 2016. "Large-scale mining in a small developing country: Macroeconomic impacts of revenue allocation policies," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 433-443.
    4. Viccaro, Mauro & Rocchi, Benedetto & Cozzi, Mario & Severino, Marino, 2015. "The socioeconomic impact derived from the oil royalty allocation on regional development," 2015 Fourth Congress, June 11-12, 2015, Ancona, Italy 207861, Italian Association of Agricultural and Applied Economics (AIEAA).
    5. Manfred Wiebelt & Rainer Schweickert & Clemens Breisinger & Marcus Böhme, 2011. "Oil revenues for public investment in Africa: targeting urban or rural areas?," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 147(4), pages 745-770, November.
    6. Breisinger, Clemens & Diao, Xinshen & Wiebelt, Manfred, 2014. "Can oil-led growth and structural change go hand in hand in Ghana?," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 507-523.
    7. World Bank, 2016. "Moldova Trade Study," World Bank Other Operational Studies 24043, The World Bank.
    8. Shashidhara Kolavalli & Elizabeth Robinson & Guyslain Ngeleza & Felix Asante, 2012. "Economic Transformation in Ghana: Where Will the Path Lead?," Journal of African Development, African Finance and Economic Association, vol. 14(2), pages 41-78.
    9. Wiebelt, Manfred & Pauw, Karl & Matovu, John Mary & Twimukye, Evarist & Benson, Todd, 2011. "Managing future oil revenues in Uganda for agricultural development and poverty reduction: A CGE analysis of challenges and options," Kiel Working Papers 1696, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    10. Marbuah, George, 2014. "Understanding crude oil import demand behaviour in Ghana," MPRA Paper 60436, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Oil fund; Public expenditures; Growth; Computable general equilibrium (CGE) analysis; Development strategies;

    JEL classification:

    • H4 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods
    • O5 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies

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