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Which financial frictions? Parsing the evidence from the financial crisis of 2007-09

Author

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  • Tobias Adrian
  • Paolo Colla
  • Hyun Song Shin

Abstract

We provide an overview of data requirements necessary to monitor repurchase agreements (repos) and securities lending (sec lending) markets for the purposes of informing policymakers and researchers about firm-level and systemic risk. We start by explaining the functioning of these markets, and argue that it is crucial to understand the institutional arrangements. Data collection is currently incomplete. A comprehensive collection should include six characteristics of repo and sec lending trades at the firm level: principal amount, interest rate, collateral type, haircut, tenor, and counterparty.

Suggested Citation

  • Tobias Adrian & Paolo Colla & Hyun Song Shin, 2011. "Which financial frictions? Parsing the evidence from the financial crisis of 2007-09," Staff Reports 528, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fednsr:528
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Cúrdia, Vasco & Woodford, Michael, 2016. "Credit Frictions and Optimal Monetary Policy," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(C), pages 30-65.
    2. Adrian, Tobias & Shin, Hyun Song, 2010. "Liquidity and leverage," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 418-437, July.
    3. Murillo Campello & Erasmo Giambona & John R. Graham & Campbell R. Harvey, 2011. "Liquidity Management and Corporate Investment During a Financial Crisis," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 24(6), pages 1944-1979.
    4. Becker, Bo & Ivashina, Victoria, 2014. "Cyclicality of credit supply: Firm level evidence," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 76-93.
    5. Simon Gilchrist & Egon Zakrajsek, 2012. "Credit Spreads and Business Cycle Fluctuations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(4), pages 1692-1720, June.
    6. Markus K. Brunnermeier & Thomas M. Eisenbach & Yuliy Sannikov, 2012. "Macroeconomics with Financial Frictions: A Survey," Levine's Working Paper Archive 786969000000000384, David K. Levine.
    7. Gilchrist, Simon & Yankov, Vladimir & Zakrajsek, Egon, 2009. "Credit market shocks and economic fluctuations: Evidence from corporate bond and stock markets," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(4), pages 471-493, May.
    8. Heitor Almeida & Murillo Campello & Michael S. Weisbach, 2004. "The Cash Flow Sensitivity of Cash," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 59(4), pages 1777-1804, August.
    9. Toni M. Whited & Guojun Wu, 2006. "Financial Constraints Risk," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 19(2), pages 531-559.
    10. Sudheer Chava & Michael R. Roberts, 2008. "How Does Financing Impact Investment? The Role of Debt Covenants," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 63(5), pages 2085-2121, October.
    11. Steven N. Kaplan & Luigi Zingales, 1997. "Do Investment-Cash Flow Sensitivities Provide Useful Measures of Financing Constraints?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(1), pages 169-215.
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    Cited by:

    1. Adrian, Tobias & Boyarchenko, Nina, 2013. "Intermediary balance sheets," Staff Reports 651, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    2. Igan, Deniz & Kabundi, Alain & De Simone, Francisco Nadal & Tamirisa, Natalia, 2017. "Monetary policy and balance sheets," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 169-184.
    3. Goldstein, Itay & Razin, Assaf, 2015. "Three Branches of Theories of Financial Crises," Foundations and Trends(R) in Finance, now publishers, vol. 10(2), pages 113-180, 30.
    4. Adrian, Tobias & Boyarchenko, Nina, 2012. "Intermediary leverage cycles and financial stability," Staff Reports 567, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, revised 01 Feb 2015.
    5. Linda S. Goldberg, 2013. "Banking globalization, transmission, and monetary policy autonomy," Staff Reports 640, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    6. Rebecca Zarutskie & Tiantian Yang, 2016. "How Did Young Firms Fare during the Great Recession? Evidence from the Kauffman Firm Survey," NBER Chapters,in: Measuring Entrepreneurial Businesses: Current Knowledge and Challenges, pages 253-290 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Philippe Bacchetta & Eric van Wincoop, 2016. "The Great Recession: A Self-Fulfilling Global Panic," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 8(4), pages 177-198, October.
    8. Bo Becker & Jens Josephson, 2016. "Insolvency Resolution and the Missing High-Yield Bond Markets," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 29(10), pages 2814-2849.
    9. IIBOSHI Hirokuni & MATSUMAE Tatsuyoshi & NISHIYAMA Shin-Ichi, 2014. "Sources of the Great Recession:A Bayesian Approach of a Data-Rich DSGE model with Time-Varying Volatility Shocks," ESRI Discussion paper series 313, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    10. Emil Siriwardane, 2014. "Using proprietary credit default swap (CDS) data from 2010 to 2014, I show that capital fluctuations for sellers of CDS protection are an important determinant of CDS spread movements. I first establi," Working Papers 14-10, Office of Financial Research, US Department of the Treasury, revised 12 Feb 2015.
    11. Josef Schroth, 2012. "Financial Crisis Resolution," Staff Working Papers 12-42, Bank of Canada.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Financial crises ; Finance ; Macroeconomics ; Econometric models ; Bank loans ; Bonds ; Credit;

    JEL classification:

    • G10 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • G20 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - General
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • E20 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)

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