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Sources of the Great Recession:A Bayesian Approach of a Data-Rich DSGE model with Time-Varying Volatility Shocks

Author

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  • IIBOSHI Hirokuni
  • MATSUMAE Tatsuyoshi
  • NISHIYAMA Shin-Ichi

Abstract

In order to investigate sources of the Great Recession (Dec. 2007 to Jun. 2009) of the US economy in the latter portion of the first decade of the 2000s, we modified the standard New Keynesian dynamic stochastic general equilibrium (DSGE) model by embedding financial frictions in both the banking and the corporate sectors. Furthermore, the structural shocks in the model are assumed to possess stochastic volatility (SV) with a leverage effect. Then, we estimated the model using a data-rich estimation method and utilized up to 40 macroeconomic time series in the estimation. In light of a DSGE model, we suggest the following three empirical evidences in the Great Recession:(1) the negative bank net-worth shock gradually spread before the corporate net worth shock burst ; (2) the data-rich approach and the structural shocks with SV found the contribution of the corporate net worth shock to a substantial portion of the macroeconomic fluctuations after the Great Recession, which is unlike the standard DSGE model; and (3) the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) would work to bail out financial institutions, whereas balance sheets in the corporate sector would still not have stopped deteriorating. Incorporating time-varying volatilities of shocks into the DSGE model makes their credible bands narrower than half of the constant volatilities, which result implies that it is a realistic assumption based on the dynamics of the structural shocks. It is plausible that tiny volatilities (or uncertainty) in ordinary times change to an extraordinary magnitude at the turning points of business cycles. Keywords: New Keynesian DSGE model, Data-rich approach, Bayesian estimation, financial friction, stochastic volatility, leverage effect. JEL Classification: E32, E37, C32, C53.

Suggested Citation

  • IIBOSHI Hirokuni & MATSUMAE Tatsuyoshi & NISHIYAMA Shin-Ichi, 2014. "Sources of the Great Recession:A Bayesian Approach of a Data-Rich DSGE model with Time-Varying Volatility Shocks," ESRI Discussion paper series 313, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:esj:esridp:313
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Adrian, Tobias & Shin, Hyun Song, 2010. "Liquidity and leverage," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 418-437, July.
    2. Tobias Adrian & Paolo Colla & Hyun Song Shin, 2011. "Which financial frictions? Parsing the evidence from the financial crisis of 2007-09," Staff Reports 528, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    3. Zheng Liu & Daniel F. Waggoner & Tao Zha, 2011. "Sources of macroeconomic fluctuations: A regime‐switching DSGE approach," Quantitative Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 2(2), pages 251-301, July.
    4. Durbin, James & Koopman, Siem Jan, 2012. "Time Series Analysis by State Space Methods," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, edition 2, number 9780199641178.
    5. Carlstrom, Charles T & Fuerst, Timothy S, 1997. "Agency Costs, Net Worth, and Business Fluctuations: A Computable General Equilibrium Analysis," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(5), pages 893-910, December.
    6. Albert, James H & Chib, Siddhartha, 1993. "Bayes Inference via Gibbs Sampling of Autoregressive Time Series Subject to Markov Mean and Variance Shifts," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 11(1), pages 1-15, January.
    7. IIBOSHI Hirokuni, 2012. "Measuring the Effects of Monetary Policy: A DSGE-DFM Approach," ESRI Discussion paper series 292, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    8. Peter N. Ireland, 2011. "A New Keynesian Perspective on the Great Recession," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 43(1), pages 31-54, February.
    9. Iiboshi, Hirokuni & Matsumae, Tatsuyoshi & Namba, Ryoichi & Nishiyama, Shin-Ichi, 2015. "Estimating a DSGE model for Japan in a data-rich environment," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 25-55.
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    Cited by:

    1. Shirai, Daichi, 2016. "Persistence and Amplification of Financial Frictions," MPRA Paper 72187, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E37 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications
    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • C53 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Forecasting and Prediction Models; Simulation Methods

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