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An Analysis of the Literature on International Unconventional Monetary Policy

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  • Saroj Bhattarai
  • Christopher J. Neely

Abstract

This paper evaluates the literature on international unconventional monetary policies (UMP). Introducing market segmentation, limits-to-arbitrage, and time-consistent policy in standard models permits a theoretical role for UMP. Empirical studies provide compelling evidence that UMP influenced international asset prices and tail-risk in the desired manner. Calibrated modeling and vector autoregressive (VAR) exercises imply that these policies also improved macroeconomic outcomes. We assess the recent debate on the empirical evidence and discuss central bank assessments of UMP. Despite qualified successes, we recommend that UMP be reserved for crises and/or when the zero bound constrains conventional monetary policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Saroj Bhattarai & Christopher J. Neely, 2016. "An Analysis of the Literature on International Unconventional Monetary Policy," Working Papers 2016-021, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, revised 04 May 2020.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedlwp:2016-021
    DOI: 10.20955/wp.2016.021
    Note: Previous title [updated October 2018]: A Survey of the Empirical Literature on U.S. Unconventional Monetary Policy
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Coibion, Olivier & Georgarakos, Dimitris & Gorodnichenko, Yuriy & Weber, Michael, 2020. "Forward Guidance and Household Expectations," IZA Discussion Papers 12979, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Olivier Coibion & Yuriy Gorodnichenko & Michael Weber & Michael Weber, 2019. "Monetary Policy Communications and their Effects on Household Inflation Expectations," CESifo Working Paper Series 7464, CESifo.
    3. Rangan Gupta & Hardik A. Marfatia, 2017. "A Note on the Impact of Unconventional Monetary Policy Shocks in the US on Emerging Market REITs: A Qual VAR Approach," Working Papers 201736, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    4. Mamaysky, Harry, 2018. "The time horizon of price responses to quantitative easing," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 32-49.
    5. Salomon Fiedler & Isabel Hanisch & Dr. Nils Jannsen Hanisch & Prof. Dr. Maik Wolters, 2017. "Effectiveness of Unconventional Monetary Policy in the Euro Area: An Assessment Based on a Literature Survey," Credit and Capital Markets, Credit and Capital Markets, vol. 50(4), pages 455-488.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    event study; quantitative easing; effective lower bound; unconventional monetary policy;

    JEL classification:

    • E51 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Money Supply; Credit; Money Multipliers
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • F31 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Exchange
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • E61 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Policy Objectives; Policy Designs and Consistency; Policy Coordination

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