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Summary panel: monetary policy at the zero lower bound: balancing the risks


  • Alan S. Blinder


Among the many unusual aspects of life in a very-low-inflation economy that might have been discussed, attention here has focussed on the zero lower bound on nominal interest rates. That was a wise choice, I think, for the conduct of monetary policy at or near zero nominal interest rates raises many questions which economists have not thought much about. Fundamentally, the issue is this: Does an economy with a zero nominal interest rate follow more or less the same economic laws as it does in normal times--except that one variable is stuck at zero? Or is the situation more akin to physics at zero gravity, or near absolute zero temperature, where behavior is fundamentally different, even strange? I think the conclusion we seem to be reaching here at Woodstock is that it may indeed be a new world, Tevye.

Suggested Citation

  • Alan S. Blinder, 2000. "Summary panel: monetary policy at the zero lower bound: balancing the risks," Conference Series ; [Proceedings], Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, pages 1093-1099.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedbcp:y:2000:p:1093-1099

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Thanaset Chevapatrakul & Tae-Hwan Kim & Paul Mizen, 2009. "The Taylor Principle and Monetary Policy Approaching a Zero Bound on Nominal Rates: Quantile Regression Results for the United States and Japan," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 41(8), pages 1705-1723, December.
    2. Ortiz, Marco, 2015. "Choques de colas anchas y política monetaria," Revista Estudios Económicos, Banco Central de Reserva del Perú, issue 29, pages 17-31.
    3. Paul Mizen & Tae-Hwan Kim & Alan Thanaset, "undated". "Evaluating the Taylor Principle Over the Distribution of the Interest Rate: Evidence from the US, UK and Japan," Discussion Papers 07/05, University of Nottingham, Centre for Finance, Credit and Macroeconomics (CFCM).
    4. João Braz Pinto & João Sousa Andrade, 2015. "A Monetary Analysis of the Liquidity Trap," GEMF Working Papers 2015-06, GEMF, Faculty of Economics, University of Coimbra.
    5. Ito, Hiro, 2003. "Was Japan’s Real Interest Rate Really Too High During the 1990s? The Role of the Zero Interest Rate Bound and Other Factors," Santa Cruz Department of Economics, Working Paper Series qt48k5q6vd, Department of Economics, UC Santa Cruz.
    6. Ben S. Bernanke & Vincent R. Reinhart & Brian P. Sack, 2004. "Monetary Policy Alternatives at the Zero Bound: An Empirical Assessment," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 35(2), pages 1-100.
    7. Chattopadhyay, Siddhartha & Daniel, Betty C., 2014. "The Inflation Target at the Zero Lower Bound," MPRA Paper 66096, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Neely, Christopher J., 2015. "Unconventional monetary policy had large international effects," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 101-111.
    9. Gabriel P. Mathy & Matthew Jaremski, 2016. "How Was the Quantitative Easing Program of the 1930s Unwound?," Working Papers 2016-01, American University, Department of Economics.
    10. Freydorf, Christoph & Kimmich, Christian & Koudela, Thomas & Schuster, Ludwig & Wenzlaff, Ferdinand, 2012. "Wachstumszwänge in der Geldwirtschaft. Zwischenbericht der Wissenschaftlichen Arbeitsgruppe nachhaltiges Geld," EconStor Preprints 142471, ZBW - German National Library of Economics.
    11. Chattopadhyay, Siddhartha & Daniel, Betty C., 2015. "Taylor-Rule Exit Policies for the Zero Lower Bound," MPRA Paper 66076, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Alfonso Palacio Vera, 2009. "Some Reflections on the Theory of the “Liquidity Trap”," Documentos de trabajo de la Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales 09-02, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales.
    13. David Amirault & Brian O'Reilly, 2001. "The Zero Bound on Nominal Interest Rates: How Important Is It?," Staff Working Papers 01-6, Bank of Canada.
    14. Robert Pollin, 2012. "The great US liquidity trap of 2009–2011: are we stuck pushing on strings?," Review of Keynesian Economics, Edward Elgar Publishing, vol. 1(0), pages 55-76.
    15. Domenico Lombardi & Pierre L. Siklos & Samantha St. Amand, 2017. "Government bond yields at the effective lower bound: International evidence," CAMA Working Papers 2017-32, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    16. Alfonso Palacio Vera, 2005. "Liquidity and growth traps: a framework for the analysis of macroeconomic policy in the 'age' of Central Banks," Documentos de trabajo de la Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales 05-02, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales.
    17. Alfonso Palacio Vera, 2008. "Money wage rigidity, monopoly power and hysteresis," Documentos de trabajo de la Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales 08-02, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales.
    18. Alfonso Palacio Vera, 2008. "The "New consensus"and the Post-Keynesian approach to the analysis of liquidity traps," Documentos de trabajo de la Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales 08-03, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales.


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