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Forecasting disconnected exchange rates

  • Travis J. Berge

Catalyzed by the work of Meese and Rogoff (1983), a large literature has documented the inability of empirical models to accurately forecast exchange rates out-of-sample. This paper extends the literature by introducing an empirical strategy that endogenously builds forecast models from a broad set of conventional exchange rate signals. The method is extremely flexible, allowing for potentially nonlinear models for each currency and forecast horizon that evolve over time. Analysis of the models selected by the procedure sheds light on the erratic behavior of exchange rates and their apparent disconnect from macroeconomic fundamentals. In terms of forecast ability, the Meese-Rogoff result remains intact. At short horizons, the method cannot outperform a random walk, although at longer horizons the method does outperform the random walk null. These findings are found consistently across currencies and forecast evaluation methods.

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File URL: http://www.kansascityfed.org/publicat/reswkpap/pdf/rwp11-12.pdf
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Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City in its series Research Working Paper with number RWP 11-12.

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Date of creation: 2011
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Handle: RePEc:fip:fedkrw:rwp11-12
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  2. Philippe Bacchetta & Eric van Wincoop & Toni Beutler, 2009. "Can Parameter Instability Explain the Meese-Rogoff Puzzle?," Cahiers de Recherches Economiques du Département d'Econométrie et d'Economie politique (DEEP) 09.08, Université de Lausanne, Faculté des HEC, DEEP.
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