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Fracking and Mortgage Default

Author

Listed:
  • Chris Cunningham
  • Kristopher S. Gerardi
  • Yannan Shen

Abstract

This paper ?nds that increased hydraulic fracturing, or \"fracking,\" along the Marcellus Formation in Pennsylvania had a signi?cant, negative effect on mortgage credit risk. Controlling for potential endogeneity bias by utilizing the underlying geologic properties of the land as instrumental variables for fracking activity, we ?nd that mortgages originated before the 2007 boom in shale gas, were, post-boom, signi?cantly less likely to default in areas with greater drilling activity. The weight of evidence suggests that the greatest bene?t from fracking came from strengthening the labor market, consistent with the double trigger hypothesis of mortgage default. The results also suggest that increased fracking activity raised house prices at the county level.

Suggested Citation

  • Chris Cunningham & Kristopher S. Gerardi & Yannan Shen, 2017. "Fracking and Mortgage Default," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2017-4, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedawp:2017-04
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Kilian, Lutz & Zhou, Xiaoqing, 2018. "The propagation of regional shocks in housing markets: Evidence from oil price shocks in Canada," CFS Working Paper Series 606, Center for Financial Studies (CFS).
    2. James N. Conklin & Moussa Diop & Thao Le & Walter D’Lima, 2019. "The Importance of Originator-Servicer Affiliation in Loan Renegotiation," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 59(1), pages 56-89, July.
    3. Kilian, Lutz & Zhou, Xiaoqing, 2018. "The propagation of regional shocks in housing markets: Evidence from oil price shocks in Canada," CFS Working Paper Series 606, Center for Financial Studies (CFS).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    mortgage default; hydraulic fracking; house prices; shale gas;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • Q51 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Valuation of Environmental Effects
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes

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