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Labor Market Institutions and the Future of Work: Good Jobs for All?

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  • Werner Eichhorst

Abstract

Work and employment around the globe change continuously, but there are potentially more rapid and fundamental transformations ahead as new technologies can have major impact on what jobs will exist in the future, how people will work and how the global division of labor will evolve. This contribution tries to assess the current outlook into the foreseeable future and highlights the importance of labor market institutions that can effectively influence the future of work. The paper in particular addresses the need to reform and update labor market regulation, social protection and active labor market policies as well as the education systems.

Suggested Citation

  • Werner Eichhorst, 2017. "Labor Market Institutions and the Future of Work: Good Jobs for All?," Working Papers id:11689, eSocialSciences.
  • Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:11689
    Note: Institutional Papers
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Melanie Arntz & Terry Gregory & Ulrich Zierahn, 2016. "The Risk of Automation for Jobs in OECD Countries: A Comparative Analysis," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 189, OECD Publishing.
    2. Berg, Janine., 2016. "Income security in the on-demand economy : findings and policy lessons from a survey of crowdworkers," ILO Working Papers 994906483402676, International Labour Organization.
    3. Boeri, Tito, 2011. "Institutional Reforms and Dualism in European Labor Markets," Handbook of Labor Economics, Elsevier.
    4. David H. Autor & Frank Levy & Richard J. Murnane, 2003. "The skill content of recent technological change: an empirical exploration," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue Nov.
    5. Werner Eichhorst & Núria Rodríguez-Planas & Ricarda Schmidl & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2015. "A Road Map to Vocational Education and Training in Industrialized Countries," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 68(2), pages 314-337, March.
    6. Stefano Scarpetta, 2014. "Employment protection," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 1-12, May.
    7. Sandrine Cazes & Alexander Hijzen & Anne Saint-Martin, 2015. "Measuring and Assessing Job Quality: The OECD Job Quality Framework," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 174, OECD Publishing.
    8. Kluve, Jochen, 2010. "The effectiveness of European active labor market programs," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(6), pages 904-918, December.
    9. John Martin, 2015. "Activation and active labour market policies in OECD countries: stylised facts and evidence on their effectiveness," IZA Journal of Labor Policy, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-29, December.
    10. repec:iza:izawol:journl:y:2014:p:12 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Frey, Carl Benedikt & Osborne, Michael A., 2017. "The future of employment: How susceptible are jobs to computerisation?," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 254-280.
    12. David H. Autor, 2015. "Why Are There Still So Many Jobs? The History and Future of Workplace Automation," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 29(3), pages 3-30, Summer.
    13. Eichhorst, Werner, 2017. "Labor Market Institutions and the Future of Work: Good Jobs for All?," IZA Policy Papers 122, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    14. Maarten Goos & Alan Manning & Anna Salomons, 2014. "Explaining Job Polarization: Routine-Biased Technological Change and Offshoring," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(8), pages 2509-2526, August.
    15. Werner Eichhorst & Paul Marx (ed.), 2015. "Non-Standard Employment in Post-Industrial Labour Markets," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 14770, June.
    16. Amable, Bruno, 2003. "The Diversity of Modern Capitalism," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199261147.
    17. Lawrence F. Katz & Alan B. Krueger, 2016. "The Rise and Nature of Alternative Work Arrangements in the United States, 1995-2015," Working Papers 603, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    18. Pierre Koning, 2016. "Privatizing sick pay: Does it work?," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 324-324, December.
    19. Eichhorst, Werner, 2015. "Do We Have to Be Afraid of the Future World of Work?," IZA Policy Papers 102, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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    1. Eichhorst, Werner, 2017. "Labor Market Institutions and the Future of Work: Good Jobs for All?," IZA Policy Papers 122, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    labor market institutions; job quality; non-standard employment; future of work;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J58 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor-Management Relations, Trade Unions, and Collective Bargaining - - - Public Policy
    • J65 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment Insurance; Severance Pay; Plant Closings
    • J88 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Standards - - - Public Policy

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