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The coevolution of segregation, polarized beliefs and discrimination: the case of private versus state education

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  • Levy, Gilat
  • Razin, Ronny

Abstract

In this paper we analyze the coevolution of segregation into private and state schools, beliefs about the educational merits of di¤erent schools, and labour market discrimination. In a dynamic model, we characterize a necessary and sufficient condition on initial levels of segregation and beliefs under which full polarisation of beliefs and long run labour market discrimination are sustainable. The model suggests a new perspective on the long term e¤ects of different policy interventions, such as integration, school vouchers and policies that are directly targeted towards influencing beliefs.

Suggested Citation

  • Levy, Gilat & Razin, Ronny, 2017. "The coevolution of segregation, polarized beliefs and discrimination: the case of private versus state education," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 68532, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  • Handle: RePEc:ehl:lserod:68532
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Levy, Gilat & Razin, Ronny, 2018. "Immigration into Prejudiced Societies: Segregation and Echo Chambers effects," CEPR Discussion Papers 12630, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

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    • D0 - Microeconomics - - General

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