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Does long-term care subsidisation reduce hospital admissions?

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  • Costa-Font, Joan
  • Jiménez-Martínez, Sergi
  • Vilaplana, Cristina

Abstract

One of the intended effects of an integrated network of long-term care (LTC) services lies in the reduction of (unnecessary) health care utilisation. This paper draws upon the quasi-experimental evidence from Spain to examine the causal effect of the expansion of affordable long-term care (LTC) access (after the introduction of a new universal LTC subsidy) on hospital admissions (both on the internal and external margin) and its duration or length of stay (LOS). We find robust evidence of a reduction in both measures of hospitalisation among both those receiving a caregiving allowance and, though less intense, among beneficiaries of publicly funded home care (amounting to 11% of total hospital costs), and among regions coordinating health and social care. Consistently, a reduction in the subsidy is found to significantly attenuate such effects.

Suggested Citation

  • Costa-Font, Joan & Jiménez-Martínez, Sergi & Vilaplana, Cristina, 2016. "Does long-term care subsidisation reduce hospital admissions?," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 67911, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  • Handle: RePEc:ehl:lserod:67911
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    hospital admissions; hospital utilisation; long-term care reform; bed-blocking; hurdle Poisson model; Spain;

    JEL classification:

    • H53 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Welfare Programs
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • J14 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of the Elderly; Economics of the Handicapped; Non-Labor Market Discrimination

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