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Some Identification Issues in Nonparametric Linear Models with Endogenous Regressors

  • Thomas A. Severini

    (Northwestern University)

  • Gautam Tripathi

    (University of Connecticut)

In applied work economists often seek to relate a given response variable y to some causal parameter mu* associated with it. This parameter usually represents a summarization based on some explanatory variables of the distribution of y, such as a regression function, and treating it as a conditional expectation is central to its identification and estimation. However, the interpretation of mu* as a conditional expectation breaks down if some or all of the explanatory variables are endogenous. This is not a problem when mu* is modelled as a parametric function of explanatory variables because it is well known how instrumental variables techniques can be used to identify and estimate mu*. In contrast, handling endogenous regressors in nonparametric models, where mu* is regarded as fully unknown, presents difficult theoretical and practical challenges. In this paper we consider an endogenous nonparametric model based on a conditional moment restriction. We investigate identification related properties of this model when the unknown function mu* belongs to a linear space. We also investigate underidentification of mu* along with the identification of its linear functionals. Several examples are provided in order to develop intuition about identification and estimation for endogenous nonparametric regression and related models.

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Paper provided by University of Connecticut, Department of Economics in its series Working papers with number 2005-12.

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Length: 21 pages
Date of creation: Apr 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:uct:uconnp:2005-12
Note: We thank Jeff Wooldridge and two anonymous referees for comments that greatly improved this paper.
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  1. Oliver Linton & Enno Mammen & Jens Perch Nielsen & C Tanggaard, 2000. "Yield curve estimation by kernel smoothing methods," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 2270, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  2. S. Darolles & Y. Fan & J. P. Florens & E. Renault, 2011. "Nonparametric Instrumental Regression," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 79(5), pages 1541-1565, 09.
  3. Chunrong Ai & Xiaohong Chen, 2003. "Efficient Estimation of Models with Conditional Moment Restrictions Containing Unknown Functions," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 71(6), pages 1795-1843, November.
  4. Whitney K. Newey & James L. Powell & Francis Vella, 1998. "Nonparametric Estimation of Triangular Simultaneous Equations Models," Working papers 98-6, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  5. Newey, Whitney K. & McFadden, Daniel, 1986. "Large sample estimation and hypothesis testing," Handbook of Econometrics, in: R. F. Engle & D. McFadden (ed.), Handbook of Econometrics, edition 1, volume 4, chapter 36, pages 2111-2245 Elsevier.
  6. Jean-Pierre Florens & James Heckman & Costas Meghir & Edward Vytlacil, 2002. "Instrumental variables, local instrumental variables and control functions," CeMMAP working papers CWP15/02, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  7. Peter Hall & Joel L. Horowitz, 2003. "Nonparametric methods for inference in the presence of instrumental variables," CeMMAP working papers CWP02/03, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  8. Jeffrey M. Wooldridge, 2001. "Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262232197, June.
  9. Whitney K. Newey & James L. Powell, 2003. "Instrumental Variable Estimation of Nonparametric Models," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 71(5), pages 1565-1578, 09.
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