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Policy mandates for macro-prudential and monetary policies in a new Keynesian framework

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  • Levine, Paul
  • Lima, Diana

Abstract

In the aftermath of the financial crisis, the role of monetary policy and macro-prudential regulation in promoting financial stability is under discussion. The old debate concerning whether monetary policy should respond to credit and asset price bubbles was revived, whereas macro-prudential regulation is being assessed as an alternative macroeconomic tool to deal with financial imbalances. The paper explores both sides of the debate in a New Keynesian framework with financial frictions by comparing the welfare and stabilisation impacts of distinct policy regimes. First, we investigate whether there is a welfare benefit from monetary policy leaning against financial instability. We show that monetary policy rules of this type perform better than conventional monetary rules. Second, by introducing macro-prudential regulation in the model, results from optimal policy analysis suggest also that there are welfare gains, even in the case in which monetary and macro-prudential authorities are independent and react to their own policy goal. JEL Classification: E30, E50, G28

Suggested Citation

  • Levine, Paul & Lima, Diana, 2015. "Policy mandates for macro-prudential and monetary policies in a new Keynesian framework," Working Paper Series 1784, European Central Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecb:ecbwps:20151784
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    Cited by:

    1. Ag�nor, Pierre-Richard & Gambacorta, Leonardo & Kharroubi, Enisse & Lombardo, Giovanni & Pereira da Silva, Luiz A., 2017. "The International Dimensions of Macroprudential Policies," CEPR Discussion Papers 12108, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Ivens, Annika, 2018. "Optimal fiscal policy under private debt deleveraging," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 97(C), pages 1-18.
    3. Kitano, Shigeto & Takaku, Kenya, 2020. "Capital controls, macroprudential regulation, and the bank balance sheet channel," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 63(C).
    4. Krug, Sebastian, 2018. "The interaction between monetary and macroprudential policy: Should central banks 'lean against the wind' to foster macro-financial stability?," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 12, pages 1-69.
    5. Pierre-Richard Agénor & Alessandro Flamini, 2016. "Institutional Mandates for Macroeconomic and Financial Stability," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 231, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
    6. Palek, Jakob & Schwanebeck, Benjamin, 2019. "Optimal monetary and macroprudential policy in a currency union," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 167-186.
    7. Pierre-Richard Agénor & Luiz Awazu Pereira da Silva, 2019. "Global Banking, Financial Spillovers, and Macroprudential Policy Coordination," BIS Working Papers 764, Bank for International Settlements.
    8. Carmela D’Avino, 2020. "Global Banking and Macroprudential Policy: New Evidence on U.S. Banks," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 54(4), pages 1095-1121, October.
    9. E. Jondeau & J-G. Sahuc, 2018. "A General Equilibrium Appraisal of Capital Shortfall," Working papers 668, Banque de France.
    10. Philipp Kirchner & Benjamin Schwanebeck, 2017. "Optimal Unconventional Monetary Policy in the Face of Shadow Banking," MAGKS Papers on Economics 201725, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).
    11. Matteo F. Ghilardi & Shanaka J. Peiris, 2016. "Capital Flows, Financial Intermediation and Macroprudential Policies," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 27(4), pages 721-746, September.
    12. Krug, Sebastian, 2015. "The interaction between monetary and macroprudential policy: Should central banks "lean against the wind" to foster macrofinancial stability?," Economics Working Papers 2015-08, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Department of Economics.
    13. Philipp Kirchner & Benjamin Schwanebeck, 2020. "Shadow banking and the design of macroprudential policy in a monetary union," MAGKS Papers on Economics 202024, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    DSGE; financial frictions; macro-prudential policy; monetary policy;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E30 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • E50 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - General
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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