IDEAS home Printed from
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this paper

Macroprudential Rules and Monetary Policy when Financial Frictions Matter

  • Jeannine Bailliu
  • Césaire Meh
  • Yahong Zhang

This paper examines the interaction between monetary policy and macroprudential policy and whether policy makers should respond to financial imbalances. To address this issue, we build a dynamic general equilibrium model that features financial market frictions and financial shocks as well as standard macroeconomic shocks. We estimate the model using Canadian data. Based on these estimates, we show that it is beneficial to react to financial imbalances. The size of these benefits depends on the nature of the shock where the benefits are larger in the presence of financial shocks that have broader effects on the macroeconomy.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL:
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by Bank of Canada in its series Staff Working Papers with number 12-6.

in new window

Length: 37 pages
Date of creation: 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:bca:bocawp:12-6
Contact details of provider: Postal:
234 Wellington Street, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0G9, Canada

Phone: 613 782-8845
Fax: 613 782-8874
Web page:

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Merola, Rossana, 2014. "The role of financial frictions during the crisis: an estimated DSGE model," Dynare Working Papers 33, CEPREMAP.
  2. Schmitt-Grohe, Stephanie & Uribe, Martin, 2007. "Optimal simple and implementable monetary and fiscal rules," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(6), pages 1702-1725, September.
  3. Francisco Covas & Yahong Zhang, 2010. "Price-level versus inflation targeting with financial market imperfections," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 43(4), pages 1302-1332, November.
  4. Semmler, Willi & Zhang, Wenlang, 2007. "Asset price volatility and monetary policy rules: A dynamic model and empirical evidence," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 411-430, May.
  5. Urban Jermann & Vincenzo Quadrini, 2007. "Financial Innovations and Macroeconomic Volatility," 2007 Meeting Papers 50, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  6. Danny Leung, 2008. "Markups in Canada: Have They Changed and Why?," Staff Working Papers 08-8, Bank of Canada.
  7. Ian Christensen & Césaire Meh & Kevin Moran, 2011. "Bank Leverage Regulation and Macroeconomic Dynamics," Cahiers de recherche 1140, CIRPEE.
  8. Jaromir Benes & Michael Kumhof, 2011. "Risky Bank Lending and Optimal Capital Adequacy Regulation," IMF Working Papers 11/130, International Monetary Fund.
  9. Dominic Quint & Pau Rabanal, 2014. "Monetary and Macroprudential Policy in an Estimated DSGE Model of the Euro Area," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 10(2), pages 169-236, June.
  10. Paolo Angelini & Stefano Neri & Fabio Panetta, 2011. "Monetary and macroprudential policies," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 801, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  11. Frank Smets & Raf Wouters, 2007. "Shocks and Frictions in US Business Cycles : a Bayesian DSGE Approach," Working Paper Research 109, National Bank of Belgium.
  12. Michael Woodford, 2003. "Optimal Interest-Rate Smoothing," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 70(4), pages 861-886.
  13. Lawrence J. Christiano & Roberto Motto, 2004. "The Great Depression and the Friedman-Schwartz Hypothesis," Computing in Economics and Finance 2004 169, Society for Computational Economics.
  14. Michael R. King & Eric Santor, 2007. "Family Values: Ownership Structure, Performance and Capital Structure of Canadian Firms," Staff Working Papers 07-40, Bank of Canada.
  15. Andrea Gerali & Stefano Neri & Luca Sessa & Federico M. Signoretti, 2010. "Credit and Banking in a DSGE Model of the Euro Area," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 42(s1), pages 107-141, 09.
  16. Rubio, Margarita & Carrasco-Gallego, José A., 2014. "Macroprudential and monetary policies: Implications for financial stability and welfare," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 326-336.
  17. Frank Smets, 2014. "Financial Stability and Monetary Policy: How Closely Interlinked?," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 10(2), pages 263-300, June.
  18. Bernanke, Ben S. & Gertler, Mark & Gilchrist, Simon, 1999. "The financial accelerator in a quantitative business cycle framework," Handbook of Macroeconomics, in: J. B. Taylor & M. Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Macroeconomics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 21, pages 1341-1393 Elsevier.
  19. Alasdair Scott & Pau Rabanal & Prakash Kannan, 2009. "Monetary and Macroprudential Policy Rules in a Model with House Price Booms," IMF Working Papers 09/251, International Monetary Fund.
  20. Ian Christensen & Ali Dib, 2008. "The Financial Accelerator in an Estimated New Keynesian Model," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 11(1), pages 155-178, January.
  21. Vasco Cúrdia & Michael Woodford, 2009. "Credit spreads and monetary policy," Staff Reports 385, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  22. Tommaso Monacelli & Ester Faia, 2005. "Optimal Interest Rate Rules, Asset Prices and Credit Frictions," Computing in Economics and Finance 2005 452, Society for Computational Economics.
  23. University of Siena & Riccardo Fiorito, 2008. "Labor Supply Elasticities: Can Micro Be Misleading for Macro?," 2008 Meeting Papers 902, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  24. Badarau, Cristina & Popescu, Alexandra, 2014. "Monetary policy and credit cycles: A DSGE analysis," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 301-312.
  25. Stephanie Schmitt-Grohé & Martín Uribe, 2006. "Optimal Fiscal and Monetary Policy in a Medium-Scale Macroeconomic Model," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 2005, Volume 20, pages 383-462 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  26. Dib, Ali & Mendicino, Caterina & Zhang, Yahong, 2013. "Price-level targeting rules and financial shocks: The case of Canada," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 941-953.
  27. Lawrence Christiano & Roberto Motto & Massimo Rostagno, 2007. "Two Reasons Why Money and Credit May be Useful in Monetary Policy," NBER Working Papers 13502, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  28. Simon Gilchrist & Masashi Saito, 2008. "Expectations, Asset Prices, and Monetary Policy: The Role of Learning," NBER Chapters, in: Asset Prices and Monetary Policy, pages 45-102 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  29. Jean boivin & Timothy Lane & Césaire Meh, 2010. "Should Monetary Policy Be Used to Counteract Financial Imbalances?," Bank of Canada Review, Bank of Canada, vol. 2010(Summer), pages 23-36.
  30. Calvo, Guillermo A., 1983. "Staggered prices in a utility-maximizing framework," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 383-398, September.
  31. Ali Dib & Caterina Mendicino & Yahong Zhang, 2008. "Price Level Targeting in a Small Open Economy with Financial Frictions: Welfare Analysis," Staff Working Papers 08-40, Bank of Canada.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bca:bocawp:12-6. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: ()

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.