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Firm Training and Labour Demand in Belgium: Do Productivity Dominate Cost Effects?

  • Benoît Mahy
  • Mélanie Volral

This paper models and estimates the impact of quantitative and qualitative training financed by the firm on labour demand in Belgium. It assumes profit maximising firms producing under a short run monopolistic competition regime, where training can increase labour demand through its positive net effect on labour productivity or decrease it through higher direct labour costs and wages. The estimation of our model on a panel of 17,812 firms over the period 1999-2007 allowing to control for the potential simultaneity between training and labour demand and for unobserved workplace characteristics reveals a small positive impact of training variables on labour demand. This suggests that productivity effects dominate cost effects.

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File URL: https://dipot.ulb.ac.be/dspace/bitstream/2013/59297/3/10-08Mahy_Volral_Training%20and%20Labour%20Demand.pdf
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Paper provided by ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles in its series DULBEA Working Papers with number 10-08.

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Length: 35 p.
Date of creation: 22 Jun 2010
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published by:
Handle: RePEc:dul:wpaper:2013/59297
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://difusion.ulb.ac.be

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  1. Daron Acemoglu & Joern-Steffen Pischke, 1998. "Beyond Becker: Training in Imperfect Labor Markets," Working papers 98-12, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  2. Leuven, Edwin & Oosterbeek, Hessel, 2002. "A New Approach to Estimate the Wage Returns to Work-Related Training," IZA Discussion Papers 526, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Wulfsberg, F., 1996. "Adjustment Costs and Dynamic Labour demand in Norwegian Manufacturing Firms," Memorandum 23/1996, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
  4. Arulampalam, Wiji & Booth, Alison L, 2001. "Learning and Earning: Do Multiple Training Events Pay? A Decade of Evidence from a Cohort of Young British Men," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 68(271), pages 379-400, August.
  5. Hausman, Jerry A, 1978. "Specification Tests in Econometrics," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(6), pages 1251-71, November.
  6. Kuckulenz, Anja & Zwick, Thomas, 2003. "The Impact of Training on Earnings: Differences Between Participant Groups and Training Forms," ZEW Discussion Papers 03-57, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  7. Katz, Eliakim & Ziderman, Adrian, 1990. "Investment in General Training: The Role of Information and Labour Mobility," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 100(403), pages 1147-58, December.
  8. Conti, Gabriella, 2005. "Training, productivity and wages in Italy," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 557-576, August.
  9. Russell Davidson & James G. MacKinnon, 1987. "Testing for Consistency using Artificial Regressions," Working Papers 687, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
  10. Ballot, Gerard & Fakhfakh, Fathi & Taymaz, Erol, 2001. "Firms' human capital, R&D and performance: a study on French and Swedish firms," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(4), pages 443-462, September.
  11. Booth, Alison L, 1993. "Private Sector Training and Graduate Earnings," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 75(1), pages 164-70, February.
  12. Maarten Goos & Jozef Konings, 2001. "Does Rent-Sharing Exist in Belgium ?. An Empirical Analysis Using Firm Level Data," Reflets et perspectives de la vie économique, De Boeck Université, vol. 0(1), pages 65-79.
  13. Lorraine Dearden & Howard Reed & John Van Reenen, 2005. "The impact of training on productivity and wages : evidence from British panel data," Economic History Working Papers 779, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
  14. Alan Barrett & Philip J. O'Connell, 2001. "Does training generally work? The returns to in-company training," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 54(3), pages 647-662, April.
  15. Bassanini, Andrea & Booth, Alison L. & Brunello, Giorgio & De Paola, Maria & Leuven, Edwin, 2005. "Workplace Training in Europe," IZA Discussion Papers 1640, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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