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The Quantification of Structural Reforms in OECD countries: A New Framework

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  • Balázs Égert
  • Peter Gal

Abstract

This document describes and discusses a new supply side framework that quantifies the impact of structural reforms on per capita income in OECD countries. It presents the overall macroeconomic impacts of reforms by aggregating over the effects on physical capital, employment and productivity through a production function. On the basis of reforms defined as observed changes in policies, the paper finds that product market regulation has the largest overall single policy impact five years after the reforms. But the combined impact of all labour market policies is considerably larger than that of product market regulation. The paper also shows that policy impacts can differ at different horizons. The overall long-term effects on GDP per capita of policies transiting through capital deepening can be considerably larger than the 5- to 10- year impacts. By contrast, the long-term impact of policies coming only via the employment rate channel materialises at shorter horizon.

Suggested Citation

  • Balázs Égert & Peter Gal, 2017. "The Quantification of Structural Reforms in OECD countries: A New Framework," EconomiX Working Papers 2017-15, University of Paris Nanterre, EconomiX.
  • Handle: RePEc:drm:wpaper:2017-15
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    structural reforms; product markets; labour markets; regulation; simulation; multi-factor productivity; investment; employment; per capita impact; OECD.;

    JEL classification:

    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • E17 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications
    • E22 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Investment; Capital; Intangible Capital; Capacity
    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • J08 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics Policies

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