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Are Ethical and Social Banks Less Risky? Evidence from a New Dataset

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  • Marlene Karl

Abstract

This paper introduces a new and comprehensive dataset on “alternative” banks in EU and OECD countries. Alternative banks (e.g. ethical, social or sustainable banking) experienced a recent increase in media interest and have been hailed as an answer to the financial crisis but no research exists on their stability. This paper studies whether alternative banks differ from conventional banks in terms of riskiness. For this I construct a comprehensive dataset of alternative banks and compare their riskiness with an adequately matched control group of conventional banks using mean comparison and panel regression techniques. The main result is that alternative banks are significantly more stable (in terms of z-score) than their conventional counterparts. The results are robust to different estimation methods and data specifications. Alternative banks also have lower loan to asset ratios and higher customer deposit ratios than conventional banks.

Suggested Citation

  • Marlene Karl, 2015. "Are Ethical and Social Banks Less Risky? Evidence from a New Dataset," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1484, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:diw:diwwpp:dp1484
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    File URL: http://www.diw.de/documents/publikationen/73/diw_01.c.508003.de/dp1484.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Becchetti, Leonardo & Palestini, Arsen & Solferino, Nazaria & Elisabetta Tessitore, M., 2014. "The socially responsible choice in a duopolistic market: A dynamic model of “ethical product” differentiation," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 114-123.
    2. Leonardo Becchetti & Rocco Ciciretti & Ambrogio Dalò & Stefano Herzel, 2015. "Socially responsible and conventional investment funds: performance comparison and the global financial crisis," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(25), pages 2541-2562, May.
    3. Leonardo Becchetti & Melody Garcia, 2008. "Do collateral theories work in social banking ?," CEIS Research Paper 131, Tor Vergata University, CEIS, revised 07 Nov 2008.
    4. Hatice Ozer Balli & Bent Sørensen, 2013. "Interaction effects in econometrics," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 45(1), pages 583-603, August.
    5. Simon Cornée & Ariane Szafarz, 2014. "Vive la Différence: Social Banks and Reciprocity in the Credit Market," Post-Print CEB, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles, vol. 125(3), pages 361-380.
    6. Brambor, Thomas & Clark, William Roberts & Golder, Matt, 2006. "Understanding Interaction Models: Improving Empirical Analyses," Political Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 14(1), pages 63-82, January.
    7. Buch, Claudia M. & Neugebauer, Katja, 2011. "Bank-specific shocks and the real economy," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 35(8), pages 2179-2187, August.
    8. Leire San-Jose & Jose Retolaza & Jorge Gutierrez-Goiria, 2011. "Are Ethical Banks Different? A Comparative Analysis Using the Radical Affinity Index," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 100(1), pages 151-173, April.
    9. Bourkhis, Khawla & Nabi, Mahmoud Sami, 2013. "Islamic and conventional banks' soundness during the 2007–2008 financial crisis," Review of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(2), pages 68-77.
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    Cited by:

    1. Francisco Climent, 2018. "Ethical Versus Conventional Banking: A Case Study," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(7), pages 1-13, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Ethical banking; social banking; bank risk; financial crisis;

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G32 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Financing Policy; Financial Risk and Risk Management; Capital and Ownership Structure; Value of Firms; Goodwill
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • M14 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - Corporate Culture; Diversity; Social Responsibility

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