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Bank-specific shocks and the real economy

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  • Buch, Claudia M.
  • Neugebauer, Katja

Abstract

Governments often justify interventions into the financial system in the form of bail outs or liquidity assistance with the systemic importance of large banks for the real economy. In this paper, we analyze whether idiosyncratic shocks to loan growth at large banks have effects on real GDP growth. We employ a measure of idiosyncratic shocks which follows Gabaix (forthcoming). He shows that idiosyncratic shocks to large firms have an impact on US GDP growth. In an application to the banking sector, we find evidence that changes in lending by large banks have a significant short-run impact on GDP growth. Episodes of negative loan growth rates and the Eastern European countries in our sample drive these results.

Suggested Citation

  • Buch, Claudia M. & Neugebauer, Katja, 2011. "Bank-specific shocks and the real economy," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 35(8), pages 2179-2187, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jbfina:v:35:y:2011:i:8:p:2179-2187
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    Cited by:

    1. Antonakakis, Nikolaos & Breitenlechner, Max & Scharler, Johann, 2015. "Business cycle and financial cycle spillovers in the G7 countries," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 154-162.
    2. Franziska Bremus, 2011. "Financial Integration and Macroeconomic Stability: What Role for Large Banks?," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1178, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    3. Peter Haiss & Hannes Juvan & Bernhard Mahlberg, 2016. "The Impact of Financial Crises on the Finance–Growth Relationship: A European Perspective," Economic Notes, Banca Monte dei Paschi di Siena SpA, vol. 45(3), pages 423-444, November.
    4. Franziska Bremus & Claudia Buch & Katheryn Russ & Monika Schnitzer, 2013. "Big Banks and Macroeconomic Outcomes: Theory and Cross-Country Evidence of Granularity," NBER Working Papers 19093, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Jinjarak, Yothin & Zheng, Huanhuan, 2014. "Granular institutional investors and global market interdependence," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 61-81.
    6. Marlene Karl, 2015. "Are Ethical and Social Banks Less Risky? Evidence from a New Dataset," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1484, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    7. repec:bla:obuest:v:79:y:2017:i:4:p:546-569 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Nikolaos Antonakakis & Max Breitenlechner & Johann Scharler, 2014. "How Strongly are Business Cycles and Financial Cycles Linked in the G7 Countries?," Working Papers 2014-07, Faculty of Economics and Statistics, University of Innsbruck.
    9. Mésonnier, J-S. & Stevanovic, D., 2012. "Bank leverage shocks and the macroeconomy: a new look in a data-rich environment," Working papers 394, Banque de France.
    10. Bremus, Franziska & Buch, Claudia M., 2017. "Granularity in banking and growth: Does financial openness matter?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 300-316.
    11. Franziska Bremus & Claudia M. Buch, 2015. "Banking Market Structure and Macroeconomic Stability: Are Low-Income Countries Special?," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 20(1), pages 73-100, February.
    12. Mary Amiti & David E. Weinstein, 2013. "How Much do Idiosyncratic Bank Shocks Affect Investment? Evidence from Matched Bank-Firm Loan Data," NBER Working Papers 18890, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Amiti, Mary & Weinstein, David E., 2013. "How Much do Bank Shocks Affect Investment? Evidence from Matched Bank-Firm Loan Data," CEPR Discussion Papers 9400, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    14. Katja Neugebauer, 2010. "Schockübertragung und Drittlandeffekte auf internationalen Bankenmärkten," Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung / Quarterly Journal of Economic Research, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 79(4), pages 59-74.
    15. Marlene Karl, 2015. "Are ethical and social banks less risky? Evidence from a new dataset," WWWforEurope Working Papers series 96, WWWforEurope.
    16. Bremus, Franziska M., 2015. "Cross-border banking, bank market structures and market power: Theory and cross-country evidence," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 242-259.
    17. Bremus, Franziska & Krause, Thomas & Noth, Felix, 2017. "Bank-specific shocks and house price growth in the U.S," IWH Discussion Papers 3/2017, Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Granular Residual Idiosyncratic shocks Banking sector Size effects GDP growth;

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles

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