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Shocks at large banks and banking sector distress: the Banking Granular Residual

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  • Blank, Sven
  • Buch, Claudia M.
  • Neugebauer, Katja

Abstract

Size matters in banking. In this paper, we explore whether shocks originating at large banks affect the probability of distress of smaller banks and thus the stability of the banking system. Our analysis proceeds in two steps. In a first step, we follow Gabaix (2008a) and construct a measure of idiosyncratic shocks at large banks, the so-called Banking Granular Residual. This measure documents the importance of size effects for the German banking system. In a second step, we incorporate this measure of idiosyncratic shocks at large banks into an integrated stress-testing model for the German banking system following De Graeve et al. (2007). We find that positive shocks at large banks reduce the probability of distress of small banks.

Suggested Citation

  • Blank, Sven & Buch, Claudia M. & Neugebauer, Katja, 2009. "Shocks at large banks and banking sector distress: the Banking Granular Residual," Discussion Paper Series 2: Banking and Financial Studies 2009,04, Deutsche Bundesbank.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:bubdp2:200904
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    Cited by:

    1. Itzhak Ben-DAVID & Francesco A. FRANZONI & Rabih MOUSSAWI & John SEDUNOV III, 2015. "The Granular Nature of Large Institutional Investors," Swiss Finance Institute Research Paper Series 15-67, Swiss Finance Institute, revised Apr 2016.
    2. Franziska Bremus & Claudia Buch & Katheryn Russ & Monika Schnitzer, 2013. "Big Banks and Macroeconomic Outcomes: Theory and Cross-Country Evidence of Granularity," NBER Working Papers 19093, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Jinjarak, Yothin & Zheng, Huanhuan, 2014. "Granular institutional investors and global market interdependence," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 61-81.
    4. Omar Blanco Arroyo & Simone Alfarano, 2017. "Granularity of the Business Cycle Fluctuations: The Spanish Case," Economía Coyuntural,Revista de temas de perspectivas y coyuntura, Instituto de Investigaciones Económicas y Sociales 'José Ortiz Mercado' (IIES-JOM), Facultad de Ciencias Económicas, Administrativas y Financieras, Universidad Autónoma Gabriel René Moreno, vol. 2(1), pages 31-58.
    5. Valentina Cioli & Alessandro Giannozzi, 2013. "Basilea 3 e la stabilità finanziaria delle banche: quale relazione con la dimensione della banca?," ECONOMIA E DIRITTO DEL TERZIARIO, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2013(2), pages 261-286.
    6. Bremus, Franziska & Buch, Claudia M., 2017. "Granularity in banking and growth: Does financial openness matter?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 300-316.
    7. Buch, Claudia M. & Neugebauer, Katja, 2011. "Bank-specific shocks and the real economy," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 35(8), pages 2179-2187, August.
    8. Vazquez, Francisco & Tabak, Benjamin M. & Souto, Marcos, 2012. "A macro stress test model of credit risk for the Brazilian banking sector," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 8(2), pages 69-83.
    9. Xavier Gabaix, 2011. "The Granular Origins of Aggregate Fluctuations," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 79(3), pages 733-772, May.
    10. Sven Blank & Jonas Dovern, 2010. "What macroeconomic shocks affect the German banking system?: Analysis in an integrated micro-macro model," Journal of Financial Economic Policy, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 2(2), pages 126-148, June.
    11. repec:diw:diwfin:diwfin02030 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Katja Neugebauer, 2010. "Schockübertragung und Drittlandeffekte auf internationalen Bankenmärkten," Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung / Quarterly Journal of Economic Research, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 79(4), pages 59-74.
    13. del Rosal, Ignacio, 2013. "The granular hypothesis in EU country exports," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 120(3), pages 433-436.
    14. Bremus, Franziska & Krause, Thomas & Noth, Felix, 2017. "Bank-specific shocks and house price growth in the U.S," IWH Discussion Papers 3/2017, Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH).
    15. Valentina Cioli & Alessandro Giannozzi, 2014. "Banche di credito cooperativo come leva di stabilità finanziaria. Un’analisi comparata con le banche commerciali. Appendice," ECONOMIA E DIRITTO DEL TERZIARIO, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2014(2), pages 239-268.
    16. repec:diw:diwfin:diwfin is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Banking sector distress; size effects; shock propagation; Granular Residual;

    JEL classification:

    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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