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An Analysis of the Spatial Distribution of the Clothing and Textile Industry in SADC

  • Cecil Mlatsheni
  • Sandrine Rospabé

    ()

    (School of Economics, University of Cape Town)

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    This paper focuses on the clothing and textile industry in the SADC region, with specific reference to the locational characteristics and developments of these two industry sectors over the last decade. The study links the economic and spatial characteristics of the clothing and textile industries, looks at the current situation and analyses the drivers and barriers to industrialisation and location. Significant economic, political and social importance is attached to these sectors, especially in the light of the recent developments within SADC and trade agreements with the US and the EU. In order to further stimulate the development of the clothing and textile industry, as well as draw up relevant policy to ensure regional competitiveness and continued economic growth, awareness of the industries' locational distribution in the region is important. The paper finds clothing and textile production in the region to be highly polarised, with the industries being drawn to the more developed markets, as well as the surrounding lower-(labour) cost countries (having ready access to the South African market). Regional integration is one of the key criteria for the continued attractiveness of the region to the clothing-textile pipeline, as firms seek to build competitive supply linkages in order to improve their local and international competitiveness. These developments are to a large extent driven by the changing international trade environment.

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    File URL: http://www.dpru.uct.ac.za/sites/default/files/image_tool/images/36/DPRU%20WP02-065.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2002
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    Paper provided by University of Cape Town, Development Policy Research Unit in its series Working Papers with number 02065.

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    Length: 51 pages
    Date of creation: Apr 2002
    Date of revision:
    Publication status: Published in Working Paper Series by the Development Policy Research Unit, April 2002, pages 1-51
    Handle: RePEc:ctw:wpaper:02065
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