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Intergenerational Mobility in Britain: Evidence from unemployment patterns

  • Donal O'Neill;

    ()

  • Olive Sweetman

    ()

Several papers have examined the intergenerational transmission of well being by looking at the relationship between parents' and children's income. However, by concentrating on those who are working these studies exclude some of the very poorest in society, the long-term unemployed. In this paper we extend the empirical work on intergenerational welfare in the U.K by looking at the links between fathers' and sons' unemployment histories. Using an approach which takes account of both incidence and intensity of son's unemployment we provide further evidence showing that parental background is an important determinant of a child's future welfare. A son whose father was unemployed 20 years earlier is almost twice as likely to be unemployed as a son whose father was not unemployed. Furthermore this dependency remains significant after controlling for a range of sons characteristics including education, ability and family composition.

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File URL: http://repec.maynoothuniversity.ie/mayecw-files/N730997.pdf
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Paper provided by Department of Economics, Finance and Accounting, National University of Ireland - Maynooth in its series Economics, Finance and Accounting Department Working Paper Series with number n730997.

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Date of creation: Sep 1997
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Handle: RePEc:may:mayecw:n730997
Contact details of provider: Postal: Maynooth, Co. Kildare
Phone: 353-1-7083728
Fax: 353-1-7083934
Web page: http://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/economics-finance-and-accounting

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  1. Arulampalam, Wiji & Booth, Alison L & Elias, Peter, 1996. "Modeling Work-related Training and Training Effects Using Count Data Techniques," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 448, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
  2. Peter Gottschalk, 1993. "Is The Correlation In Welfare Participation Across Generations Spurious?," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 224, Boston College Department of Economics.
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