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The effects of father’s worklessness on young adults in the UK

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  • Wouter Zwysen

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Abstract

J620, J640, J30 Copyright Zwysen; licensee Springer. 2015

Suggested Citation

  • Wouter Zwysen, 2015. "The effects of father’s worklessness on young adults in the UK," IZA Journal of European Labor Studies, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-15, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:izaels:v:4:y:2015:i:1:p:1-15:10.1186/2193-9012-4-2
    DOI: 10.1186/2193-9012-4-2
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gregg, Paul & Tominey, Emma, 2005. "The wage scar from male youth unemployment," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 487-509, August.
    2. O'Neill, Donal & Sweetman, Olive, 1998. "Intergenerational Mobility in Britain: Evidence from Unemployment Patterns," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 60(4), pages 431-447, November.
    3. Carsten Ochsen & Heinz Welsch, 2011. "The social costs of unemployment: accounting for unemployment duration," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(27), pages 3999-4005.
    4. Miles Corak & Patrizio Piraino, 2011. "The Intergenerational Transmission of Employers," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 29(1), pages 37-68, January.
    5. Mark B. Stewart, 2007. "The interrelated dynamics of unemployment and low-wage employment," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(3), pages 511-531.
    6. Bingley, Paul & Corak, Miles & Westergård-Nielsen, Niels C., 2011. "The Intergenerational Transmission of Employers in Canada and Denmark," IZA Discussion Papers 5593, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Chul-In Lee & Gary Solon, 2009. "Trends in Intergenerational Income Mobility," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 91(4), pages 766-772, November.
    8. Kostas Mavromaras & Peter Sloane & Zhang Wei, 2015. "The scarring effects of unemployment, low pay and skills under-utilization in Australia compared," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(23), pages 2413-2429, May.
    9. Tyra Ekhaugen, 2009. "Extracting the causal component from the intergenerational correlation in unemployment," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 22(1), pages 97-113, January.
    10. Angus Armstrong, 2012. "Belief in a Just World and Children's Cognitive Scores," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 222(1), pages 7-19, October.
    11. Rannia Leontaridi & Peter Sloane, 2001. "Measuring The Quality Of Jobs," LoWER Working Papers wp7, AIAS, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies.
    12. Lynn, Peter & Burton, Jonathan & Kaminska, Olena & Knies, Gundi & Nandi, Alita, 2012. "An initial look at non-response and attrition in Understanding Society," Understanding Society Working Paper Series 2012-02, Understanding Society at the Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    13. Green, Francis, 2011. "Unpacking the misery multiplier: How employability modifies the impacts of unemployment and job insecurity on life satisfaction and mental health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 265-276, March.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Andrew M. Jones & Nigel Rice & Francesca Zantomio, 2016. "Acute health shocks and labour market outcomes," Working Papers 2016:09, Department of Economics, University of Venice "Ca' Foscari".
    2. Gabriella Berloffa & Eleonora Matteazzi & Paola Villa, 2016. "Family background and youth labour market outcomes across Europe," Working Papers 393, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Intergenerational transmission; Worklessness; Family background; Job quality;

    JEL classification:

    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search
    • J30 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - General

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