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Intergenerational Mobility among the Rich and Poor: Results from the National Child Development Survey

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  • Johnson, Paul
  • Reed, Howard

Abstract

Using data from the UK National Child Development Survey, we look at the relationship between sons and fathers and their position in the population income distribution. Particular attention is paid to those who start or end up near the top or bottom of the distribution. People at these extreme ends of the distribution are found to be particularly subject to immobility across the generations. Among those whose fathers are at the bottom of the distribution a clear positive relationship between test scores at age seven and likelihood of moving up the distribution appears evident. Copyright 1996 by Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Johnson, Paul & Reed, Howard, 1996. "Intergenerational Mobility among the Rich and Poor: Results from the National Child Development Survey," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 12(1), pages 127-142, Spring.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxford:v:12:y:1996:i:1:p:127-42
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    Cited by:

    1. Steffen Müller & Regina T. Riphahn & Caroline Schwientek, 2017. "Paternal unemployment during childhood: causal effects on youth worklessness and educational attainment," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 69(1), pages 213-238.
    2. Mäder Miriam & Schwientek Caroline & Riphahn Regina T. & Müller Steffen, 2015. "Intergenerational Transmission of Unemployment – Evidence for German Sons," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 235(4-5), pages 355-375, August.
    3. Olaf Hübler, 2013. "Are Tall People Less Risk Averse Than Others?," Schmollers Jahrbuch : Journal of Applied Social Science Studies / Zeitschrift für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften, Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 133(1), pages 23-42.
    4. Cowan, Robin & Jonard, Nicolas, 2007. "Merit, approbation and the evolution of social structure," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 64(3-4), pages 295-315.
    5. Gabriella Berloffa & Eleonora Matteazzi & Paola Villa, 2016. "Family background and youth labour market outcomes across Europe," Working Papers 393, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.

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