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Are Tall People Less Risk Averse than Others?

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  • Hübler, Olaf

    () (Leibniz University of Hannover)

Abstract

This paper examines the question of whether risk aversion of prime-age workers is negatively correlated with human height to a statistically significant degree. A variety of estimation methods, tests and specifications yield robust results that permit one to answer this question in the affirmative. Hausman-Taylor panel estimates, however, reveal that height effects disappear if personality traits and skills, parents' behaviour, and interactions between environment and individual abilities appear simultaneously. Height is a good proxy for these influences if they are not observable. Not only one factor but a combination of several traits and interaction effects can describe the time-invariant individual effect in a panel model of risk attitude.

Suggested Citation

  • Hübler, Olaf, 2012. "Are Tall People Less Risk Averse than Others?," IZA Discussion Papers 6441, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp6441
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    1. Being tall and risk aversion
      by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2012-05-04 19:14:00

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    Cited by:

    1. Tim Willems, 2013. "Political Accountability and Policy Experimentation: Why to Elect Left-Handed Politicians?," Economics Series Working Papers 647, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    risk preference; height;

    JEL classification:

    • D90 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - General
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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