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Do the Higher Educated Unemployed Crowd out the Lower Educated Ones in a Competition for Jobs ?

Author

Listed:
  • Bat COCKX

    (UNIVERSITE CATHOLIQUE DE LOUVAIN, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES))

  • Muriel DEJEMEPPE

    (FNRS, Belgium and UNIVERSITE CATHOLIQUE DE LOUVAIN, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES))

Abstract

This paper proposes a new method to estimate the extent of job competition between workers with different schooling levels. We estimate the structural parameters of a matching function generalised to incorporate crowding out effects. We use flow data out of unemployment containing information on the level of educational attainment of the worker, but not on the level of schooling required by the employer for the job. The method therefore avoids the bias induced by mismeasurement in the educational requirements. Applied to Belgian data, we find evidence of significant crowding out among dismissed workers, particularly at the highest schooling levels.

Suggested Citation

  • Bat COCKX & Muriel DEJEMEPPE, 2002. "Do the Higher Educated Unemployed Crowd out the Lower Educated Ones in a Competition for Jobs ?," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2002020, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
  • Handle: RePEc:ctl:louvir:2002020
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    File URL: http://sites.uclouvain.be/econ/DP/IRES/2002-20.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. A. Gautier, Pieter & J. van den Berg, Gerard & C. van Ours, Jan & Ridder, Geert, 2002. "Worker turnover at the firm level and crowding out of lower educated workers," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 46(3), pages 523-538, March.
    2. Abbring, Jaap H & van den Berg, Gerard J & van Ours, Jan C, 2001. "Business Cycles and Compositional Variation in U.S. Unemployment," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 19(4), pages 436-448, October.
    3. Christopher A. Pissarides & Barbara Petrongolo, 2001. "Looking into the Black Box: A Survey of the Matching Function," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 39(2), pages 390-431, June.
    4. F Green & Steven McIntosh & Anna Vignoles, 1999. "Overeducation and Skills - Clarifying the Concepts," CEP Discussion Papers dp0435, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    5. Eli Bekman & John Bound & Stephen Machin, 1998. "Implications of Skill-Biased Technological Change: International Evidence," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 113(4), pages 1245-1279.
    6. Gautier, Pieter A, 2002. "Unemployment and Search Externalities in a Model with Heterogeneous Jobs and Workers," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 69(273), pages 21-40, February.
    7. Coles, Melvyn G & Smith, Eric, 1998. "Marketplaces and Matching," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 39(1), pages 239-254, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Kampelmann, Stephan & Rycx, François, 2012. "The impact of educational mismatch on firm productivity: Evidence from linked panel data," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(6), pages 918-931.
    2. E. Moreno-Galbis & Henri Sneessens, 2007. "Low-skilled unemployment, capital-skill complementarity and embodied technical progress," Recherches économiques de Louvain, De Boeck Université, vol. 73(3), pages 241-272.
    3. Gabriele Cardullo & Bruno Van der Linden, 2007. "Employment Subsidies and Substitutable Skills: An Equilibrium Matching Approach," Applied Economics Quarterly (formerly: Konjunkturpolitik), Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 53(4), pages 375-404.
    4. Olivier Pierrard & Henri Sneessens, 2004. "Biased Technological Shocks, Wage Rigidities and Low-Skilled Unemployment," DNB Working Papers 020, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    5. repec:spr:izalbr:v:7:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1186_s40172-017-0061-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. François Rycx & Yves Saks & Ilan Tojerow, 2015. "Does Education Raise Productivity and Wages Equally? The Moderating Roles of Age, Gender and Industry," Working Paper Research 281, National Bank of Belgium.
    7. Batyra, Anna & Sneessens, Henri R., 2010. "Selective reductions in labor taxation: Labor market adjustments and macroeconomic performance," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 531-543, July.
    8. Moreno-Galbis, E., 2006. "Unemployment and endogenous growth with new technologies-skill complementarity," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 364-386, March.
    9. Holger Bonin & Wolfram Kempe & Hilmar Schneider, 2003. "Kombilohn oder Workfare?: Zur Wirksamkeit zweier arbeitsmarktpolitischer Strategien," Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung / Quarterly Journal of Economic Research, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 72(1), pages 51-67.
    10. Olivier, PIERARD, 2004. "Impact of Selective Reductions in Labor Taxation," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2004035, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
    11. Marie Duvivier & Maritza López-Novella, 2015. "Working Paper 10-15 - The relationship between unemployment duration and education - The case of school leavers in Belgium," Working Papers 1510, Federal Planning Bureau, Belgium.
    12. Olivier, Pierrard & Henri R., Sneessens, 2002. "Low-Skilled Unemployment, Biased Technological Shocks and Job Competition," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2003014, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES), revised 03 May 2002.
    13. Eva, MORENO-GALBIS, 2004. "Unemployment and Endogenous Growth with Capital-Skill Complementarity," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2004001, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Job competition; crowding out; overeducation; matching function; duration analysis;

    JEL classification:

    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search
    • C41 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Duration Analysis; Optimal Timing Strategies

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