IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Skill-Biased Technological Change in Denmark: A Disaggregate Perspective


  • Malchow-Møller, Nikolaj

    () (University of Southern Denmark)

  • Skaksen, Jan Rose

    () (Rockwool Foundation Research Unit)


In this paper, we provide an industry-level analysis of skill-biased technological change (SBTC) in Denmark over the last two decades. The analysis shows that SBTC has varied considerably across industries, and traditionally large Danish industries have experienced relatively less SBTC. This may partly explain why wage inequality between skilled and less skilled has risen less in Denmark than in other countries. We also find that SBTC has been concentrated in already skill-intensive industries. This contains important information about future labour requirements, as the relative importance of these industries must be expected to grow, thereby reinforcing the shift in demand for skilled labour.

Suggested Citation

  • Malchow-Møller, Nikolaj & Skaksen, Jan Rose, 2003. "Skill-Biased Technological Change in Denmark: A Disaggregate Perspective," IZA Discussion Papers 752, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp752

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. F Green & Steven McIntosh & Anna Vignoles, 1999. "Overeducation and Skills - Clarifying the Concepts," CEP Discussion Papers dp0435, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    2. Eli Bekman & John Bound & Stephen Machin, 1998. "Implications of Skill-Biased Technological Change: International Evidence," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 113(4), pages 1245-1279.
    3. Skaksen, Jan Rose & Sorensen, Anders, 2002. "Skill Upgrading and Rigid Relative Wages: The Case of Danish Manufacturing," IZA Discussion Papers 664, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Haskel, Jonathan E. & Slaughter, Matthew J., 2002. "Does the sector bias of skill-biased technical change explain changing skill premia?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 46(10), pages 1757-1783, December.
    5. Robert Feenstra & Gordon Hanson, 2001. "Global Production Sharing and Rising Inequality: A Survey of Trade and Wages," NBER Working Papers 8372, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. David H. Autor & Lawrence F. Katz & Alan B. Krueger, 1998. "Computing Inequality: Have Computers Changed the Labor Market?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 113(4), pages 1169-1213.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item


    Danish industries; skill-biased technological change;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • L6 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Manufacturing

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp752. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Mark Fallak). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.