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The innovation premium to soft skills in low-skilled occuptions

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  • Aghion, Philippe
  • Bergeaud, Antonin
  • Blundell, Richard
  • Griffith, Rachel

Abstract

Matched employee-employer data from the UK are used to analyze the wage premium to working in an innovative firm. We find that firms that are more R&D intensive pay higher wages on average, and this is particularly true for workers in some low-skilled occupations. We propose a model in which a firm's innovativeness is reflected in the degree of complementarity between workers in low-skill and high-skilled occupations, and in which non-verifiable soft skills are an important determinant of the wages of workers in low-skilled occupations. The model yields additional predictions on training, tenure and outsourcing which we also find support for in data.

Suggested Citation

  • Aghion, Philippe & Bergeaud, Antonin & Blundell, Richard & Griffith, Rachel, 2019. "The innovation premium to soft skills in low-skilled occuptions," CEPR Discussion Papers 14102, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:14102
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    1. Pierre Cahuc & Fabien Postel-Vinay & Jean-Marc Robin, 2006. "Wage Bargaining with On-the-Job Search: Theory and Evidence," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 74(2), pages 323-364, March.
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    4. Patrick Kline & Neviana Petkova & Heidi Williams & Owen Zidar, 2019. "Who Profits from Patents? Rent-Sharing at Innovative Firms," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 134(3), pages 1343-1404.
    5. Stéphane Bonhomme & Thibaut Lamadon & Elena Manresa, 2019. "A Distributional Framework for Matched Employer Employee Data," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 87(3), pages 699-739, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kong, Dongmin & Wang, Yanan & Zhang, Jian, 2020. "Efficiency wages as gift exchange: Evidence from corporate innovation in China," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 65(C).
    2. Bergeaud, Antonin & Mazet-Sonilhac, Clément & Malgouyres, Clément & Signorelli, Sara, 2021. "Technological Change and Domestic Outsourcing," IZA Discussion Papers 14603, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Moser, Christian & Saidi, Farzad & Wirth, Benjamin & Wolter, Stefanie, 2020. "Credit Supply, Firms, and Earnings Inequality," MPRA Paper 100371, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Ivy Hawah Taana & Valliappan Raju, 2020. "Determinants of project management methodologies and its effects on project success in Ghana–A conceptual paper," Journal of Administrative and Business Studies, Professor Dr. Usman Raja, vol. 6(3), pages 84-94.
    5. Kerstin Hotte & Angelos Theodorakopoulos & Pantelis Koutroumpis, 2021. "Does automation erode governments' tax basis? An empirical assessment of tax revenues in Europe," Papers 2103.04111, arXiv.org.
    6. James H. Love & Stephen Roper & Priit Vahter, 2020. "Do Firms Really Learn From Failure? The Dynamics Of Abandoned Innovation," University of Tartu - Faculty of Economics and Business Administration Working Paper Series 124, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, University of Tartu (Estonia).
    7. Jaan Masso & Priit Vahter, 2020. "Innovation As A Firm-Level Factor Of The Gender Wage Gap," University of Tartu - Faculty of Economics and Business Administration Working Paper Series 128, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, University of Tartu (Estonia).
    8. Bergeaud, Antonin & Mazet-Sonilhac, Clément & Malgouyres, Clément & Signorelli, Sara, 2021. "Technological Change and Domestic Outsourcing," IZA Discussion Papers 14603, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • L23 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Organization of Production
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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