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Costly Financial Intermediation and Excess Consumption Volatility

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Abstract

This paper documents the cyclical properties of financial intermediation costs and uses their dynamics to explain excess consumption volatility differences across countries in a dynamic stochastic general equilibrium (DSGE) framework. I find that financial development levels have no role in explaining excess consumption volatilities. Instead, the volatility of the financial sector plays the determinative role. The model matches the data, finding excess consumption volatility to be four times higher in an average emerging country compared to the US. This paper also shows that if the US had the same intermediation cost structure as the average emerging country, deteriorations in the production, consumption, labor market, business investment, and real estate market following a financial shock would increase sixfold, on average.

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  • Sapci, Ayse, 2014. "Costly Financial Intermediation and Excess Consumption Volatility," Working Papers 2014-04, Department of Economics, Colgate University, revised 11 Jun 2014.
  • Handle: RePEc:cgt:wpaper:2014-04
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    Cited by:

    1. Matthew Jaremski & Ayse Sapci, 2017. "Understanding the Cyclical Nature of Financial Intermediation Costs," Southern Economic Journal, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 84(1), pages 181-201, July.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Financial intermediation costs; Excess consumption volatility; Housing market; Financial development; Financial shocks;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance

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