IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/tor/tecipa/tecipa-459.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Liquidity, Assets and Business Cycles

Author

Listed:
  • Shouyong Shi

Abstract

I construct a tractable model to evaluate the liquidity shock hypothesis that exogenous shocks to equity market liquidity are an important cause of the business cycle. After calibrating the model, I find that a large and persistent negative liquidity shock can generate large drops in investment, employment and output. Contrary to the hypothesis, however, a negative liquidity shock generates an equity price boom. This counterfactual response of equity price is robust, provided that a negative liquidity shock tightens firms' financing constraint on investment. Also, I demonstrate that the same counterfactual response of equity price arises when there is a financial shock to a firm's collateral constraint on borrowing. For equity price to fall as it typically does in a recession, the negative liquidity/financial shock must be accompanied or caused by other changes that relax firms' financing constraint on investment. I discuss some candidates of these concurrent changes.

Suggested Citation

  • Shouyong Shi, 2012. "Liquidity, Assets and Business Cycles," Working Papers tecipa-459, University of Toronto, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:tor:tecipa:tecipa-459
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.economics.utoronto.ca/public/workingPapers/tecipa-459.pdf
    File Function: Main Text
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Bernanke, Ben S. & Gertler, Mark & Gilchrist, Simon, 1999. "The financial accelerator in a quantitative business cycle framework," Handbook of Macroeconomics,in: J. B. Taylor & M. Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Macroeconomics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 21, pages 1341-1393 Elsevier.
    2. Shouyong Shi, 1997. "A Divisible Search Model of Fiat Money," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 65(1), pages 75-102, January.
    3. Urban Jermann & Vincenzo Quadrini, 2012. "Macroeconomic Effects of Financial Shocks," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(1), pages 238-271, February.
    4. John Moore & Nobuhiro Kiyotaki, 2008. "Liquidity, Business Cycles, and Monetary Policy," 2008 Meeting Papers 35, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    5. Kiyotaki, Nobuhiro & Moore, John, 1997. "Credit Cycles," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 105(2), pages 211-248, April.
    6. Gilchrist, Simon & Leahy, John V., 2002. "Monetary policy and asset prices," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(1), pages 75-97, January.
    7. Andrea Ajello, 2016. "Financial Intermediation, Investment Dynamics, and Business Cycle Fluctuations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(8), pages 2256-2303, August.
    8. Ctirad Slavik, 2011. "Asset Prices and Business Cycles with Financial Frictions," 2011 Meeting Papers 587, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    9. Mark E. Doms & Timothy Dunne, 1998. "Capital Adjustment Patterns in Manufacturing Plants," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 1(2), pages 409-429, April.
    10. Pablo Kurlat, 2013. "Lemons Markets and the Transmission of Aggregate Shocks," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(4), pages 1463-1489, June.
    11. John Haltiwanger & Russell Cooper & Laura Power, 1999. "Machine Replacement and the Business Cycle: Lumps and Bumps," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(4), pages 921-946, September.
    12. Zheng Liu & Pengfei Wang & Tao Zha, 2013. "Land‐Price Dynamics and Macroeconomic Fluctuations," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 81(3), pages 1147-1184, May.
    13. Francisco Covas & Wouter J. Den Haan, 2011. "The Cyclical Behavior of Debt and Equity Finance," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(2), pages 877-899, April.
    14. Urban Jermann & Vincenzo Quadrini, 2012. "Erratum: Macroeconomic Effects of Financial Shocks," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(2), pages 1186-1186, April.
    15. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1990. "Liquidity and interest rates," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 50(2), pages 237-264, April.
    16. Williamson, Stephen D, 1987. "Financial Intermediation, Business Failures, and Real Business Cycles," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 95(6), pages 1196-1216, December.
    17. Bernanke, Ben & Gertler, Mark, 1989. "Agency Costs, Net Worth, and Business Fluctuations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(1), pages 14-31, March.
    18. Townsend, Robert M., 1979. "Optimal contracts and competitive markets with costly state verification," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 265-293, October.
    19. Oliver Hart & John Moore, 1994. "A Theory of Debt Based on the Inalienability of Human Capital," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 109(4), pages 841-879.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Andrea Ajello, 2016. "Financial Intermediation, Investment Dynamics, and Business Cycle Fluctuations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(8), pages 2256-2303, August.
    2. Pablo A. Guerron-Quintana & Ryo Jinnai, "undated". "Liquidity, Trends and the Great Recession," Working Papers e66, Tokyo Center for Economic Research.
    3. Cui, Wei, 2016. "Monetary–fiscal interactions with endogenous liquidity frictions," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 1-25.
    4. repec:eee:jbfina:v:89:y:2018:i:c:p:225-236 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Hyunju Kang & Bok-Keun Yu & Jongmin Yu, 2016. "Global Liquidity and Commodity Prices," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 24(1), pages 20-36, February.
    6. Alexis Derviz, 2016. "Credit Constraints and Creditless Recoveries: An Unsteady State Approach," Working Papers 2016/10, Czech National Bank, Research Department.
    7. Yiting Li & Guillaume Rocheteau & Pierre-Olivier Weill, 2012. "Liquidity and the Threat of Fraudulent Assets," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 120(5), pages 000.
    8. Engin Kara & Jasmin Sin, 2013. "Liquidity, Quantitative Easing and Optimal Monetary Policy," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 13/635, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    9. Maurizio Iacopetta, 2014. "Dynamics of assets liquidity and inequality in economies with decentralized markets," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/2029nqlehl8, Sciences Po.
    10. Jasmin Sin, 2016. "The Fiscal Multiplier in Small Open Economy; The Role of Liquidity Frictions," IMF Working Papers 16/138, International Monetary Fund.
    11. Marco Del Negro & Gauti Eggertsson & Andrea Ferrero & Nobuhiro Kiyotaki, 2017. "The Great Escape? A Quantitative Evaluation of the Fed's Liquidity Facilities," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 107(3), pages 824-857, March.
    12. Finocchiaro, Daria & Mendicino, Caterina, 2015. "Debt, equity and the Equity price puzzle," Working Paper Series 314, Sveriges Riksbank (Central Bank of Sweden).
    13. Soeren Radde & Wei Cui, 2013. "Search-Based Endogenous Illiquidity, Business Cycles and Monetary Policy," 2013 Meeting Papers 1009, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    14. Paweł Kopiec, 2018. "Interbank market turmoils and the macroeconomy," NBP Working Papers 280, Narodowy Bank Polski, Economic Research Department.
    15. repec:eee:eecrev:v:97:y:2017:i:c:p:108-130 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Valerija Botric & Iva Tomic, 2016. "Self-employment of the young and the old: exploring effects of the crisis in Croatia," Working Papers 1603, The Institute of Economics, Zagreb.
    17. Jaccard, Ivan, 2013. "Liquidity constraints, risk premia, and themacroeconomic effects of liquidity shocks," Working Paper Series 1525, European Central Bank.
    18. repec:kap:jeczfn:v:123:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s00712-017-0562-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    19. Ellington, Michael & Florackis, Chris & Milas, Costas, 2017. "Liquidity shocks and real GDP growth: Evidence from a Bayesian time-varying parameter VAR," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 93-117.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Liquidity; Assets; Business cycles; Collateral;

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E5 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit
    • G1 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Lists

    This item is featured on the following reading lists or Wikipedia pages:
    1. Canadian Macro Study Group

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:tor:tecipa:tecipa-459. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (RePEc Maintainer). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.