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The direct and spillover effects of a mental health program for disruptive students

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  • Chaisemartin, Clement de

    (UC Santa Barbara)

  • Navarrete, Nicolas

    (Paris School of Economics)

Abstract

A large literature finds that cognitive behavioral therapy programs for disruptive students can reduce their disruptiveness and improve their academic outcomes. However, the literature has mostly considered demonstration programs implemented with significant researcher involvement, and has not studied the spillover effects on ineligible students. In this paper, we use a randomized controlled trial to estimate the direct and spillover effects of one such program, implemented as a nationwide policy in Chile. The program has no effect on eligible students’ disruptiveness and academic outcomes. It increases the disruptiveness of ineligible students. Finally, it increases the segregation between eligible and ineligible students

Suggested Citation

  • Chaisemartin, Clement de & Navarrete, Nicolas, 2019. "The direct and spillover effects of a mental health program for disruptive students," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 401, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
  • Handle: RePEc:cge:wacage:401
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    File URL: https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/economics/research/centres/cage/manage/publications/401-2019_chaisemartin_navarrete.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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