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Disruptive peers and the estimation of teacher value added

Author

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  • Horoi, Irina
  • Ost, Ben

Abstract

Classroom disruption is often cited as an obstacle to effective teaching, yet little is known regarding how disruptive students influence classroom learning and teacher evaluation. In this study, we show that students with serious behavioral difficulties substantially reduce the academic performance of their peers. Since standard value-added models fail to account for these peer effects, we find that some teachers’ value added is penalized because of the students she is assigned. Importantly, we show that the assignment of disruptive students to teachers is non-random, so these peer effects do not impact the evaluation of all teachers equally.

Suggested Citation

  • Horoi, Irina & Ost, Ben, 2015. "Disruptive peers and the estimation of teacher value added," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 180-192.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:49:y:2015:i:c:p:180-192
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econedurev.2015.10.002
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Wang, Haining & Cheng, Zhiming & Smyth, Russell, 2018. "Do migrant students affect local students’ academic achievements in urban China?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 64-77.
    2. Ahn, Tom & Trogdon, Justin G., 2017. "Peer delinquency and student achievement in middle school," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 192-217.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Teacher quality; Value-added; Disruptive peers;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education

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