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Determinants and projections of demand for higher education in Portugal

  • Carlos Vieira

    ()

    (Departamento de Economia, CEFAGE-UE, Universidade de Évora)

  • Isabel Vieira

    ()

    (Departamento de Economia, CEFAGE-UE, Universidade de Évora)

This paper formulates a model of demand for higher education in Portugal considering a wide range of demographic, economic, social and institutional explanatory variables. The estimation results suggest that the number of applicants reacts positively to demographic trends, graduation rates at secondary education, female participation, compulsory schooling and the recent Bologna process. Demand reacts negatively to the existence of tuition fees and to unemployment rates. Within an adverse demographic and economic context, forecasts of demand for the next two decades suggest the need to increase participation rates, to avoid funding problems in the higher education system and increase long-term economic development prospects.

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File URL: http://www.cefage.uevora.pt/en/content/download/2696/36166/version/1/file/2011_15.pdf
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Paper provided by University of Evora, CEFAGE-UE (Portugal) in its series CEFAGE-UE Working Papers with number 2011_15.

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Length: 26 pages
Date of creation: 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cfe:wpcefa:2011_15
Contact details of provider: Postal: Colégio Espírito SANTO
Phone: (351) 266 740 869
Web page: http://www.cefage.uevora.pt
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  1. Carla Sa & Raymond Florax & Piet Rietveld, 2004. "Determinants of the Regional Demand for Higher Education in The Netherlands: A Gravity Model Approach," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(4), pages 375-392.
  2. Blaug, Mark, 1976. "The Empirical Status of Human Capital Theory: A Slightly Jaundiced Survey," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 14(3), pages 827-55, September.
  3. Duchesne, I. & Nonneman, W., 1998. "The Demand for Higher Education in Belgium," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 211-218, April.
  4. Boarini, Romina & Strauss, Hubert & de la Maisonneuve, Christine & Nicoletti, Giuseppe & Oliveira Martins, Joaquim, 2008. "Investment in Tertiary Education : Main Determinants and Implications for Policy," Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine 123456789/7987, Paris Dauphine University.
  5. Ana Rute Cardoso & Miguel Portela & Fernando Alexandre & Carla Sá, 2007. "Demand for higher education programs: the impact of the Bologna process," NIPE Working Papers 4/2007, NIPE - Universidade do Minho.
  6. repec:ese:iserwp:2008-16 is not listed on IDEAS
  7. Cappellari, Lorenzo & Lucifora, Claudio, 2008. "The "Bologna Process" and College Enrolment Decisions," IZA Discussion Papers 3444, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. Christofides, Louis N. & Hoy, Michael & Yang, Ling, 2010. "Participation in Canadian Universities: The gender imbalance (1977-2005)," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 400-410, June.
  9. Christofides, Louis N. & Hoy, Michael & Yang, Ling, 2008. "The Determinants of University Participation in Canada (1977−2003)," IZA Discussion Papers 3805, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  10. Galper, Harvey & Dunn, Robert M, Jr, 1969. "A Short-Run Demand Function for Higher Education in the United States," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 77(5), pages 765-77, Sept./Oct.
  11. Wetzel, James & O'Toole, Dennis & Peterson, Steven, 1998. "An Analysis of Student Enrollment Demand," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 47-54, February.
  12. Christou, Costas & Haliassos, Michael, 2006. "How do students finance human capital accumulation?: The choice between borrowing and work," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 39-51, January.
  13. McPherson, Michael S & Schapiro, Morton Owen, 1991. "Does Student Aid Affect College Enrollment? New Evidence on a Persistent Controversy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(1), pages 309-18, March.
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