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The Bologna Process and widening participation in university education: new evidence from Italy

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  • Giorgio Di Pietro

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Abstract

This paper extends previous work on the effect of the Bologna reform on university enrolment in Italy. The analysis considers more recent data and also attempts to disentangle the effect of the reform from the influence on enrolment exerted by time-varying confounding factors. The empirical findings consistently show that the “Bologna Process” had a positive impact on university participation, though the magnitude of this impact is smaller than previously concluded. One main reason for our lower estimates lies in the use of a difference-in-differences methodology, which allows us to control for the influence on enrolment exerted by unobserved factors that could have changed coincidentally at the same time as the reform. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. 2012

Suggested Citation

  • Giorgio Di Pietro, 2012. "The Bologna Process and widening participation in university education: new evidence from Italy," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 39(3), pages 357-374, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:empiri:v:39:y:2012:i:3:p:357-374
    DOI: 10.1007/s10663-011-9172-5
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Annika C. Froehlich, 2016. "Does the curricular structure affect doctoral enrolment?," Journal of Business Economics, Springer, vol. 86(9), pages 1067-1089, December.
    2. Bernhard Enzi & Benedikt Siegler, 2016. "The Impact of the Bologna Reform on Student Outcomes – Evidence from Exogenous Variation in Regional Supply of Bachelor Programs in Germany," Working Papers 165, Bavarian Graduate Program in Economics (BGPE).
    3. Loris Vergolini, 2016. "Social inequalities in higher education participation in a period of educational reforms and economic recession: Evidence from an Italian province," FBK-IRVAPP Working Papers 2016-07, Research Institute for the Evaluation of Public Policies (IRVAPP), Bruno Kessler Foundation.
    4. Lerche, Katharina, 2016. "The effect of the Bologna Process on the duration of studies," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 287, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    5. Bernhard Enzi & Benedikt Siegler, 2016. "The Impact of the Bologna Reform on Student Outcomes Evidence from Exogenous Variation in Regional Supply of Bachelor Programs in Germany," ifo Working Paper Series 225, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
    6. Guccio, Calogero & Martorana, Marco & Monaco, Luisa, 2013. "Evaluating italian university teaching efficiency convergence: a non-parametric frontier approach," MPRA Paper 56673, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Benedikt Siegler, 2015. "Microeconometric Evaluations of Education Policies," ifo Beiträge zur Wirtschaftsforschung, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 57, March.
    8. Siegler, Benedikt & Enzi, Bernhard, 2016. "The Impact of the Bologna Reform on Student Outcomes," Discussion Papers in Economics 29635, University of Munich, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Bologna Process; University enrolment; Difference-in-differences; I2;

    JEL classification:

    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education

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