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Does the curricular structure affect doctoral enrolment?

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  • Annika C. Froehlich

    () (University of Augsburg)

Abstract

This paper examines whether the curricular structure affects the decision to pursue doctoral studies after completing the highest degree at college level. Prior to the Bologna Process, most curricula in Europe’s higher education were either organized in a one-cycle structure (e.g. the German Diplom) or in a two-cycle structure (e.g. Bachelor/Master). Based on Spence’s signalling theory I hypothesize that due to the existence of a second degree at college level as in the two-cycle system, the incentive to enrol in doctoral studies is smaller in these higher educational systems. This hypothesis is put to an empirical test based on data from 23 European countries between 1995 and 2005. Random effects estimations reveal that enrolment rates in doctoral studies are significantly higher if curricula are organized in a one-cycle structure instead of a two-cycle structure, after controlling for factors of educational institutions, labour market conditions and socio-economic characteristics of a country’s population.

Suggested Citation

  • Annika C. Froehlich, 2016. "Does the curricular structure affect doctoral enrolment?," Journal of Business Economics, Springer, vol. 86(9), pages 1067-1089, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jbecon:v:86:y:2016:i:9:d:10.1007_s11573-016-0812-x
    DOI: 10.1007/s11573-016-0812-x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Erik E. Lehmann & Michele Meoli & Stefano Paleari & Sarah A. E. Stockinger, 2018. "Approaching effects of the economic crisis on university efficiency: a comparative study of Germany and Italy," Eurasian Business Review, Springer;Eurasia Business and Economics Society, vol. 8(1), pages 37-54, March.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Higher educational systems; Doctoral education; Signalling; Cross-country analysis;

    JEL classification:

    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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