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The Impact of Chernobyl on Health and Labour Market Performance

  • Hartmut Lehmann
  • Jonathan Wadsworth

Using longitudinal data from Ukraine we examine the extent of any long-lasting effects of radiation exposure from the Chernobyl disaster on the health and labour market performance of the adult workforce. The variation in the local area level of radiation fallout from the Chernobyl accident is considered as a random exogenous shock with which to try to establish its causal impact on poor health, labour force participation, hours worked and wages. There appears to be a significant positive association between local area-level radiation dosage and perception of poor health, though much weaker associations between local area-level dosage and other specific self-reported health conditions. There is also some evidence to suggest that those more exposed to Chernobyl-induced radiation have significantly lower levels of labour market performance twenty years on.

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Paper provided by Centre for Economic Performance, LSE in its series CEP Discussion Papers with number dp1052.

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Date of creation: May 2011
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Handle: RePEc:cep:cepdps:dp1052
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/publications/series.asp?prog=CEP

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