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Impact of the Fukushima nuclear accident on the body mass index of students in Japan

Author

Listed:
  • Yamamura, Eiji

Abstract

Based on prefecture-level panel data from Japan for 2010 and 2012, this paper investigates how the 2011 Fukushima nuclear accident influenced the body mass index (BMI) of students aged between 5 and 17 years old. A differences-in-differences approach was used to show that (1) students’ BMIs reduced across Japan from 2010 to 2012 and (2) compared with other prefectures there was an increase in the BMIs of primary school students aged 5–11 years old in Fukushima as a result of the Fukushima accident. These findings suggest that restrictions placed on outdoor exercise as a result of the nuclear accident in Fukushima prevented primary school children from burning calories consumed; in other areas a reduction in the use of air-conditioning increased the burning of calories.

Suggested Citation

  • Yamamura, Eiji, 2013. "Impact of the Fukushima nuclear accident on the body mass index of students in Japan," MPRA Paper 43920, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:43920
    as

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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/43920/1/MPRA_paper_43920.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Cawley, John & Spiess, C. Katharina, 2008. "Obesity and skill attainment in early childhood," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 6(3), pages 388-397, December.
    2. Eiji Yamamura, 2012. "Influence of body image in urbanized areas: differences in long-term changes in teenage body mass index between boys and girls in Japan," Journal of Bioeconomics, Springer, vol. 14(3), pages 243-256, October.
    3. Danzer, Alexander M. & Danzer, Natalia, 2011. "The Long-Term Effects of the Chernobyl Catastrophe on Subjective Well-Being and Mental Health," IZA Discussion Papers 5906, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Douglas Almond & Lena Edlund & Mårten Palme, 2009. "Chernobyl's Subclinical Legacy: Prenatal Exposure to Radioactive Fallout and School Outcomes in Sweden," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 124(4), pages 1729-1772.
    5. Lehmann, Hartmut & Wadsworth, Jonathan, 2011. "The impact of Chernobyl on health and labour market performance," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 843-857.
    6. Kobayashi, Masako & Kobayashi, Maiko, 2006. "The relationship between obesity and seasonal variation in body weight among elementary school children in Tokyo," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 4(2), pages 253-261, June.
    7. Matthew Kahn, 2007. "Environmental disasters as risk regulation catalysts? The role of Bhopal, Chernobyl, Exxon Valdez, Love Canal, and Three Mile Island in shaping U.S. environmental law," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 35(1), pages 17-43, August.
    8. Mitsuyo Ando & Fukunari Kimura, 2012. "How did the Japanese Exports Respond to Two Crises in the International Production Networks? The Global Financial Crisis and the Great East Japan Earthquake," Asian Economic Journal, East Asian Economic Association, vol. 26(3), pages 261-287, September.
    9. Eva M. Berger, 2010. "The Chernobyl Disaster, Concern about the Environment, and Life Satisfaction," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 63(1), pages 1-8, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Fukushima; Nuclear accident; Body mass index;

    JEL classification:

    • H19 - Public Economics - - Structure and Scope of Government - - - Other
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health

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