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How do inflation expectations form? New insights from a high-frequency survey

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  • Gabriele Galati
  • Peter Heemeijer
  • Richhild Moessner

Abstract

We provide new insights on the formation of inflation expectations - in particular at a time of great financial and economic turmoil - by evaluating results from a survey conducted from July 2009 through July 2010. Participants in this survey answered a weekly questionnaire about their short-, medium- and long-term inflation expectations. Participants received common information sets with data relevant to euro area inflation. Our analysis of survey responses reveals several interesting results. First, our evidence is consistent with long-term expectations having remained well anchored to the ECB's definition of price stability, which acted as a focal point for long-term expectations. Second, the turmoil in euro area bond markets triggered by the Greek fiscal crisis influenced short- and medium-term inflation expectations but had only a very small impact on long-term expectations. By contrast, longterm expectations did not react to developments of the euro area wide fiscal burden. Third, participants changed their expectations fairly frequently. The longer the horizon, the less frequent but larger these changes were. Fourth, expectations exhibit a large degree of timevariant non-normality. Fifth, inflation expectations appear fairly homogenous across groups of agents at the shorter horizon but less so at the medium- and long-term horizons.

Suggested Citation

  • Gabriele Galati & Peter Heemeijer & Richhild Moessner, 2011. "How do inflation expectations form? New insights from a high-frequency survey," BIS Working Papers 349, Bank for International Settlements.
  • Handle: RePEc:bis:biswps:349
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:red:issued:16-80 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. R. Anton Braun & Tomoyuki Nakajima, 2011. "Making the Case for a Low Intertemporal Elasticity of Substitution," KIER Working Papers 788, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research.
    3. Annarita Colasante & Simone Alfarano & Eva Camacho-Cuena & Mauro Gallegati, 2017. "Long-run expectations in a Learning-to-Forecast Experiment: A Simulation Approach," Working Papers 2017/03, Economics Department, Universitat Jaume I, Castellón (Spain).
    4. Colasante, Annarita & Alfarano, Simone & Camacho-Cuena, Eva, 2018. "The term structure of cross-sectional dispersion of expectations in a Learning-to-Forecast Experiment," MPRA Paper 84835, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. R. Anton Braun & Tomoyuki Nakajima, 2018. "Why Prices Don't Respond Sooner to a Prospective Sovereign Debt Crisis"," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 29, pages 235-255, July.
    6. Young Bin Ahn & Yoichi Tsuchiya, 2016. "Directional analysis of consumers’ forecasts of inflation in a small open economy: evidence from South Korea," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(10), pages 854-864, February.
    7. Grothe, Magdalena & Lejsgaard Autrup, Søren, 2014. "Economic surprises and inflation expectations: Has anchoring of expectations survived the crisis?," Working Paper Series 1671, European Central Bank.
    8. William R. White, 2012. "Ultra easy monetary policy and the law of unintended consequences," Globalization and Monetary Policy Institute Working Paper 126, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    inflation expectations; monetary policy; crisis;

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E37 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • C53 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Forecasting and Prediction Models; Simulation Methods

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