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Living with flexible exchange rates: issues and recent experience in inflation targeting emerging market economies

  • Corrinne Ho
  • Robert N. McCauley

This overview paper examines two main issues. The first is why the exchange rate matters, especially for emerging market economies. The second is under what circumstances and how countries have dealt with the challenges posed by the exchange rate in recent years in the context of inflation targeting. We find that emerging market economies, being more exposed to the influence of the exchange rate, are likely to accord the exchange rate a bigger role in policy assessment and decision-making. However, even with the greater emphasis on the exchange rate, the emerging market economies under review have not attended to the exchange rate in a manner that contradicted their announced inflation commitments. Furthermore, recent experience shows that having to keep an eye on the exchange rate is also a fact of life in industrial economies, inflation targeting or not.

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Paper provided by Bank for International Settlements in its series BIS Working Papers with number 130.

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Length: 55 pages
Date of creation: Feb 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:bis:biswps:130
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  1. Graciela L. Kaminsky & Carmen M. Reinhart, 1996. "The twin crises: the causes of banking and balance-of-payments problems," International Finance Discussion Papers 544, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
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  12. Guy Debelle & Miguel A. Savastano & Paul R. Masson & Sunil Sharma, 1998. "Inflation Targeting as a Framework for Monetary Policy," IMF Economic Issues 15, International Monetary Fund.
  13. Murray, J. & Van Norden, S. & Vigfusson, R., 1996. "Excess Volatility and Speculative Bubbles in the Canadian Dollar: Real of Imagined?," Technical Reports 76, Bank of Canada.
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  16. Yoon Je Cho & Robert N McCauley, 2003. "Liberalising the capital account without losing balance: lessons from Korea," BIS Papers chapters, in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), China's capital account liberalisation: international perspective, volume 15, pages 75-92 Bank for International Settlements.
  17. Schmidt-Hebbel, Klaus & Tapia, Matias, 2002. "Inflation targeting in Chile," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 13(2), pages 125-146, August.
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