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Bridge Proxy-SVAR: estimating the macroeconomic effects of shocks identified at high-frequency

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  • Andrea Gazzani

    (Bank of Italy)

  • Alejandro Vicondoa

    (Instituto de Economía, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile)

Abstract

This paper proposes a novel methodology, the Bridge Proxy-SVAR, which exploits high-frequency information for the identification of the Vector Autoregressive (VAR) models employed in macroeconomic analysis. The methodology is comprised of three steps: (I) identifying the structural shocks of interest in high-frequency systems; (II) aggregating the series of high-frequency shocks at a lower frequency; and (III) using the aggregated series of shocks as a proxy for the corresponding structural shock in lower frequency VARs. We show that the methodology correctly recovers the impact effect of the shocks, both formally and in Monte Carlo experiments. Thus the Bridge Proxy-SVAR can improve causal inference in macroeconomics that typically relies on VARs identified at low-frequency. In an empirical application, we identify uncertainty shocks in the U.S. by imposing weaker restrictions relative to the existing literature and find that they induce mildly recessionary effects.

Suggested Citation

  • Andrea Gazzani & Alejandro Vicondoa, 2020. "Bridge Proxy-SVAR: estimating the macroeconomic effects of shocks identified at high-frequency," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1274, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  • Handle: RePEc:bdi:wptemi:td_1274_20
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jentsch, Carsten & Lunsford, Kurt G., 2016. "Proxy SVARs : asymptotic theory, bootstrap inference, and the effects of income tax changes in the United States," Working Papers 16-10, University of Mannheim, Department of Economics.
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    8. Michele Piffer & Maximilian Podstawski, 2018. "Identifying Uncertainty Shocks Using the Price of Gold," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 128(616), pages 3266-3284, December.
    9. Marek Jarociński & Peter Karadi, 2020. "Deconstructing Monetary Policy Surprises—The Role of Information Shocks," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 12(2), pages 1-43, April.
    10. Karel Mertens & Morten O. Ravn, 2019. "The Dynamic Effects of Personal and Corporate Income Tax Changes in the United States: Reply," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 109(7), pages 2679-2691, July.
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    12. Pascal Paul, 2020. "The Time-Varying Effect of Monetary Policy on Asset Prices," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 102(4), pages 690-704, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Venditti, Fabrizio & Veronese, Giovanni, 2020. "Global financial markets and oil price shocks in real time," Working Paper Series 2472, European Central Bank.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    structural vector autoregression; external instrument; high-frequency identification; proxy variable; uncertainty shocks.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • C36 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Instrumental Variables (IV) Estimation
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles

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