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How do Chinese cities grow? A distribution dynamics approach

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  • Jian-Xin Wu
  • Ling-Yun He

Abstract

This paper examines the dynamic behavior of city size using a distribution dynamics approach with Chinese city data for the period 1984-2010. Instead of convergence, divergence or paralleled growth, multimodality and persistence are the dominant characteristics in the distribution dynamics of Chinese prefectural cities. Moreover, initial city size matters, initially small and medium-sized cities exhibit strong tendency of convergence, while large cities show significant persistence and multimodality in the sample period. Examination on the regional city groups shows that locational fundamentals have important impact on the distribution dynamics of city size.

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  • Jian-Xin Wu & Ling-Yun He, 2016. "How do Chinese cities grow? A distribution dynamics approach," Papers 1612.02657, arXiv.org.
  • Handle: RePEc:arx:papers:1612.02657
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