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The impacts of migrant workers consumption on energy use and CO 2 emissions in China

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  • Jing-Li Fan

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  • Hua Liao
  • Bao-Jun Tang
  • Su-Yan Pan
  • Hao Yu
  • Yi-Ming Wei

Abstract

China has a large number of rural–urban migrant workers in the “semi-urban” states, and their consumption pattern differs from that of rural residents and urban residents. To ensure that society develops sustainably and stably, it is necessary to be concerned about the issues of migrant workers. Based on the data gathered and processed, this paper focuses on the impacts of the consumption of China’s migrant workers on energy use and CO 2 emissions using the input–output method. The results show that: the living conditions, health care and allocation of educational resources have not been effectively ensured for migrant workers. The total CO 2 emission per capita of migrant workers is relatively low, at two-thirds of the national average and less than one-third that of urban residents. Marginal energy consumption and marginal carbon emission coefficients of migrant workers are slightly lower than the national average level, at 4.9 tce (tonne of standard coal equivalent) per million yuan and 11.6 t CO 2 per million yuan lower than those of urban residents. The sectors of food manufacture, and production and distribution of electricity make the greatest contributions to the total carbon emissions of migrant workers, at up to 36.3 %. The citizenization of migrant workers will lead to an increase of 272 million tons of CO 2 emissions of primary energy, and the top ten sectors, led by the sectors of electricity production and distribution, and health, will produce more than 60 % of the total increase in carbon emissions. With the acceleration of urbanization and citizenization, the total carbon emissions embodied in the consumption of migrant workers are likely to rise. Further efforts are required to control and reduce the indirect carbon emission, such as by improving energy price mechanism and optimization of the power structure. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2016

Suggested Citation

  • Jing-Li Fan & Hua Liao & Bao-Jun Tang & Su-Yan Pan & Hao Yu & Yi-Ming Wei, 2016. "The impacts of migrant workers consumption on energy use and CO 2 emissions in China," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 81(2), pages 725-743, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:nathaz:v:81:y:2016:i:2:p:725-743
    DOI: 10.1007/s11069-015-2103-1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:12:p:4535-:d:186968 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Wu, Jian-Xin & He, Ling-Yun, 2017. "How do Chinese cities grow? A distribution dynamics approach," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 470(C), pages 105-118.
    3. Hua Liao & Celio Andrade & Julio Lumbreras & Jing Tian, 2018. "CO2 Emissions in Beijing: Sectoral Linkages and Demand Drivers," CEEP-BIT Working Papers 113, Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research (CEEP), Beijing Institute of Technology.
    4. Shuddhasattwa Rafiq & Ingrid Nielsen & Russell Smyth, 2016. "Effect of Internal Migration on Air and Water Pollution in China," Monash Economics Working Papers 27-16, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    5. repec:eee:eneeco:v:64:y:2017:i:c:p:31-44 is not listed on IDEAS

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