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The linkages of sectoral carbon dioxide emission caused by household consumption in China: evidence from the hypothetical extraction method

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  • Yue-Jun Zhang

    () (Hunan University
    Hunan University)

  • Xiao-Juan Bian

    (Beijing Institute of Technology
    Beijing Institute of Technology)

  • Weiping Tan

    (Salesforce Inc.)

Abstract

The carbon dioxide emission caused by household consumption has been attracting growing attention; however, the linkage mechanisms of carbon dioxide emission caused by household consumption among sectors have been rarely studied. This paper employs the hypothetical extraction method to analyze the linkage of sectoral carbon dioxide emission caused by household consumption in China. The results show that, first, the sectors PDEH, OTHERS, MFT and SPM have the most important influence on carbon dioxide emission produced by each sector. Specifically, the sectors PDEH and SPM play the main role in pushing carbon dioxide emission, while the sectors OTHERS and MFT have important effect on pulling carbon dioxide emission. Second, the sectors with high supply carbon dioxide emission are inconsistent with those having high demand carbon dioxide emission. Finally, the carbon dioxide emission when urban household consumption expenditure rises ten thousand Yuan appears higher than that by rural household consumption expenditure.

Suggested Citation

  • Yue-Jun Zhang & Xiao-Juan Bian & Weiping Tan, 2018. "The linkages of sectoral carbon dioxide emission caused by household consumption in China: evidence from the hypothetical extraction method," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 54(4), pages 1743-1775, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:empeco:v:54:y:2018:i:4:d:10.1007_s00181-017-1272-z
    DOI: 10.1007/s00181-017-1272-z
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    2. Li, Jun & Zhang, Dayong & Su, Bin, 2019. "The Impact of Social Awareness and Lifestyles on Household Carbon Emissions in China," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 160(C), pages 145-155.
    3. Wang, Zhaohua & Rasool, Yasir & Zhang, Bin & Ahmed, Zahoor & Wang, Bo, 2020. "Dynamic linkage among industrialisation, urbanisation, and CO2 emissions in APEC realms: Evidence based on DSUR estimation," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 382-389.
    4. Haddad, Eduardo Amaral & Perobelli, Fernando Salgueiro & Araújo, Inácio Fernandes, 2020. "Input-Output Analysis of COVID-19: Methodology for Assessing the Impacts of Lockdown Measures," TD NEREUS 1-2020, Núcleo de Economia Regional e Urbana da Universidade de São Paulo (NEREUS).
    5. Hongwu Zhang & Lequan Zhang & Keying Wang & Xunpeng Shi, 2019. "Unveiling Key Drivers of Indirect Carbon Emissions of Chinese Older Households," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(20), pages 1-17, October.
    6. Lining Wang & Han Chen & Wenying Chen, 2020. "Co-control of carbon dioxide and air pollutant emissions in China from a cost-effective perspective," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 25(7), pages 1177-1197, October.
    7. Danish & Bin Zhang & Zhaohua Wang & Bo Wang, 2018. "Energy production, economic growth and CO2 emission: evidence from Pakistan," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 90(1), pages 27-50, January.
    8. Leonardo E. Torre Cepeda & Joana CeciliaChapa Cantú & Eva Edith González González, 2020. "Economic Integration Mexico-United States and Regional Performance in Mexico," Working Papers 2020-06, Banco de México.
    9. Huang, Rui & Tian, Lixin, 2021. "CO2 emissions inequality through the lens of developing countries," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 281(C).
    10. Lining Wang & Han Chen & Wenying Chen, 0. "Co-control of carbon dioxide and air pollutant emissions in China from a cost-effective perspective," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 0, pages 1-21.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Household consumption; Sectoral linkage analysis; HEM; Input–Output approach;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • L52 - Industrial Organization - - Regulation and Industrial Policy - - - Industrial Policy; Sectoral Planning Methods
    • L60 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Manufacturing - - - General

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