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City Age and City Size

  • Südekum, Jens
  • Giesen, Kristian

There has been vast interest in the distribution of city sizes in an economy, but this research has largely neglected that cities also diff er along another fundamental dimension: age. Using novel data on the foundation dates of almost 8,000 American cities, we fi nd that older cities in the US tend to be larger than younger ones. To take this nexus between city age and city size into account, we introduce endogenous city creation into a dynamic economic model of an urban system. The city size distribution that emerges in our economy delivers an excellent and robust fit to diff erent types of US city size data, in fact much better than other parameterizations derived from diff erent urban growth models. This evidence can resolve several recent debates, and build a bridge between different views in the literature on city size distributions.

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File URL: http://econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/79996/1/VfS_2013_pid_563.pdf
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Paper provided by Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association in its series Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order with number 79996.

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Date of creation: 2013
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Handle: RePEc:zbw:vfsc13:79996
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.socialpolitik.org/
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