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US city-size distribution and space

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  • Rafael González-Val

Abstract

This paper focuses on spatial city-size distribution in the United States. It proposes a new distance-based approach to analyze the influence of distance on the city-size distribution parameter by considering the Pareto distribution and using data from different definitions of US cities in 2010. Considering all possible combinations of cities within a 300-mile radius, the results indicate that the Pareto distribution cannot be rejected in most cases regardless of city size. Placebo regressions validate the results, thereby confirming the significant effect of geography on the Pareto exponent.

Suggested Citation

  • Rafael González-Val, 2019. "US city-size distribution and space," Spatial Economic Analysis, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(3), pages 283-300, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:specan:v:14:y:2019:i:3:p:283-300
    DOI: 10.1080/17421772.2019.1572917
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    JEL classification:

    • C12 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Hypothesis Testing: General
    • C14 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Semiparametric and Nonparametric Methods: General
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)

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