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Historical urban growth in Europe (1300–1800)

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  • Rafael, González-Val
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    This paper analyses the evolution of the European urban system from a long-term perspective (from 1300 to 1800). Using the method recently proposed by Clauset, Shalizi, and Newman (2009), a Pareto-type city size distribution (power law) is rejected from 1300 to 1600. A power law is a plausible model for the city size distribution only in 1700 and 1800, although the log-normal distribution is another plausible alternative model that we cannot reject. Moreover, the random growth of cities is rejected using parametric and non-parametric methods. The results reveal a clear pattern of convergent growth in all the periods.

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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/80475/1/MPRA_paper_80475.pdf
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    Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 80475.

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    Date of creation: 28 Jul 2017
    Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:80475
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