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Economic Burden of Major Foodborne Illnesses Acquired in the United States

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  • Hoffman, Sandra
  • Maculloch, Bryan
  • Batz, Michael

Abstract

Each year, approximately 48 million people become ill from foodborne illnesses in the United States. In only 20 percent of these cases (9.4 million illnesses) can a specific pathogen cause be identified; over 90 percent of these cases are caused by only 15 pathogens. This report summarizes recent estimates showing that these 9.4 million illnesses impose over $15.5 billion in economic burden annually. The report also provides “pamphlets” for each of these 15 foodborne pathogens that include: (1) a summary of information about the pathogen’s foodborne illness incidence and economic burden relative to other foodborne pathogens; (2) a disease-outcome tree showing the number of people experiencing different outcomes caused by foodborne exposure to the pathogen in the United States each year; and (3) a pie chart showing the economic burden associated with different health outcomes resulting from infection with the pathogen. This report complements the ERS data product, Cost-of-Illness Estimates for Major Foodborne Illnesses in the U.S.

Suggested Citation

  • Hoffman, Sandra & Maculloch, Bryan & Batz, Michael, 2015. "Economic Burden of Major Foodborne Illnesses Acquired in the United States," Economic Information Bulletin 205081, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:uersib:205081
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.205081
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    Cited by:

    1. Tselepidakis, Elina, 2015. "Food Safety and the Demand for Leafy Greens," 2015 AAEA & WAEA Joint Annual Meeting, July 26-28, San Francisco, California 205583, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    2. Hoffmann, Sandra & Ashton, Lydia & Todd, Jessica E. & Ahn, Jae-wan & Berck, Peter, 2021. "Attributing U.S. Campylobacteriosis Cases to Food Sources, Season, and Temperature," USDA Miscellaneous 309620, United States Department of Agriculture.
    3. Makofske, Matthew Philip, 2021. "Spoiled food and spoiled surprises: Inspection anticipation and regulatory compliance," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 190(C), pages 348-365.
    4. Steven Duret & Hong‐Minh Hoang & Evelyne Derens‐Bertheau & Anthony Delahaye & Onrawee Laguerre & Laurent Guillier, 2019. "Combining Quantitative Risk Assessment of Human Health, Food Waste, and Energy Consumption: The Next Step in the Development of the Food Cold Chain?," Risk Analysis, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 39(4), pages 906-925, April.
    5. Sandra Hoffmann & Lydia Ashton & Jae‐Wan Ahn, 2021. "Food safety: A policy history and introduction to avenues for economic research," Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 43(2), pages 680-700, June.
    6. Hoffman, Sandra & Ashton, Lydia & Todd, Jessica E & Ahn, Jae-Wan & Berck, Peter, 2021. "Attributing U.S. Campylobacteriosis Cases to Food Sources, Season, and Temperature," Economic Research Report 327200, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    7. Evans, Keith S. & Teisl, Mario F. & Lando, Amy. M. & Liu, Sherry T., 2020. "Risk perceptions and food-handling practices in the home," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 95(C).
    8. Page, Elina Tselepidakis, 2018. "Trends in Food Recalls: 2004-13," Economic Information Bulletin 276244, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    9. Yangjunna Zhang & Annette M. O'Connor & Chong Wang & James S. Dickson & H. Scott Hurd & Bing Wang, 2019. "Interventions Targeting Deep Tissue Lymph Nodes May Not Effectively Reduce the Risk of Salmonellosis from Ground Pork Consumption: A Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment," Risk Analysis, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 39(10), pages 2237-2258, October.
    10. Hoffman, Sandra & Ahn, Jae-Wan, 2021. "Updating Economic Burden of Foodborne Diseases Estimates for Inflation and Income Growth," Economic Research Report 327181, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    11. Emily Sanchez & Ryan B. Simpson & Yutong Zhang & Lauren E. Sallade & Elena N. Naumova, 2022. "Exploring Risk Factors of Recall-Associated Foodborne Disease Outbreaks in the United States, 2009–2019," IJERPH, MDPI, vol. 19(9), pages 1-20, April.
    12. Ollinger, Michael & Houser, Matthew, 2020. "Ground beef recalls and subsequent food safety performance," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 97(C).
    13. John Bovay, 2023. "Food safety, reputation, and regulation," Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 45(2), pages 684-704, June.
    14. Ray Huffaker & Monika Hartmann, 2021. "Reconstructing dynamics of foodborne disease outbreaks in the US cattle market from monitoring data," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 16(1), pages 1-15, January.
    15. Hoffmann, Sandra & Ahn, Jae-Wan, 2021. "Updating Economic Burden of Foodborne Diseases Estimates for Inflation and Income Growth," USDA Miscellaneous 316343, United States Department of Agriculture.
    16. Bovay, John, 2021. "Moral hazard under discrete information disclosure: Evidence from food-safety inspections," 2021 Allied Social Sciences Association (ASSA) Annual Meeting (Virtual), January 3-5, 2021, San Diego, California 307948, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    17. Kuchler, Fred, 2015. "How Much Does It Matter How Sick You Get? Consumers' Responses to Foodborne Disease Outbreaks of Different Severities," Economic Research Report 262205, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    18. Edwards, Matthew & Velandia, Margarita & Clark, Christopher D. & Lambert, Dayton M. & Pepper, Wendell H. & Jensen, Kimberly, 2016. "Product Liability Insurance Use Among Tennessee Fruit and Vegetable Farmers," Journal of Food Distribution Research, Food Distribution Research Society, vol. 47(2), pages 1-11, July.
    19. Hoffmann, Sandra & Ashton, Lydia & Todd, Jessica E. & Ahn, Jae-Wan & Berck, Peter, 2021. "Attributing U.S. Campylobacteriosis Cases to Food Sources, Season, and Temperature," USDA Miscellaneous 309617, United States Department of Agriculture.
    20. Nina Zhang & Emily Liu & Alexander Tang & Martin Cheng Ye & Kevin Wang & Qian Jia & Zuyi Huang, 2019. "Data-Driven Analysis of Antimicrobial Resistance in Foodborne Pathogens from Six States within the US," IJERPH, MDPI, vol. 16(10), pages 1-14, May.

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    Keywords

    Agricultural and Food Policy; Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety; Health Economics and Policy;
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