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The Dynamics of Chinese Rural Households' Participation in Labor Markets

  • Glauben, Thomas
  • Herzfeld, Thomas
  • Wang, Xiaobing

The work focuses on the frequency of each possible transition between labor market participation regimes of rural Chinese households. A continuous hazard approach is applied to empirically evaluate factors, as household, farm, and regional characteristics affecting the frequency of transition between labor market participation states. Results suggest that there are frequent changes of labor market participations regimes among the househo lds. Given the change in external conditions and other factor end owments this might indicate that households quickly response in allocating labor in order to equilibrate the resources. Further, we find that there are good chances climbing out of autarky; however the probability to fall in autarky was also remarkable over time.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/25751
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Paper provided by International Association of Agricultural Economists in its series 2006 Annual Meeting, August 12-18, 2006, Queensland, Australia with number 25751.

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Date of creation: 2006
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Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae06:25751
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  1. Benjamin, Dwayne & Brandt, Loren, 1997. "Land, Factor Markets, and Inequality in Rural China: Historical Evidence," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 460-494, October.
  2. A Corsi & JL Findeis, 2000. "True state dependence and heterogeneity in off-farm labour participation," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 27(2), pages 127-151, June.
  3. Linxiu Zhang & Jikun Huang & Scott Rozelle, 2002. "Emploi, nouveaux marchés du travail, et rôle de l'éducation dans la Chine rurale," Revue d’économie du développement, De Boeck Université, vol. 10(3), pages 191-212.
  4. Vit Sorm & Katherine Terrell, 1999. "Sectoral Restructuring and Labor Mobility: A Comparative Look at the Czech Republic," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 273, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  5. John Knight & Lina Song, 2003. "Increasing urban wage inequality in China," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 11(4), pages 597-619, December.
  6. Chen, Zhuo & Huffman, Wallace E. & Rozelle, Scott, 2004. "Migration And Local Off-Farm Working In Rural China," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 20075, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  7. Orazem, Peter F. & Vodopivec, Milan, 1997. "Value of human capital in transition to market: Evidence from Slovenia," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(3-5), pages 893-903, April.
  8. Chaplin, Hannah & Davidova, Sophia & Gorton, Matthew, 2003. "Agricultural Adjustment And The Diversification Of Farm Households In Central Europe," 2003 Annual Meeting, August 16-22, 2003, Durban, South Africa 25843, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  9. Weiss, Christoph R, 1997. "Do They Come Back Again? The Symmetry and Reversibility of Off-Farm Employment," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 24(1), pages 65-84.
  10. Glauben, Thomas & Herzfeld, Thomas & Wang, Xiaobing, 2005. "Labor Market Participation of Chinese Agricultural Households," 2005 International Congress, August 23-27, 2005, Copenhagen, Denmark 24516, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  11. Lovell Jarvis & Esperanza Vera-Toscano, 2004. "Seasonal Adjustment in a Market for Female Agricultural Workers," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 86(1), pages 254-266.
  12. Jenkins, Stephen P, 1995. "Easy Estimation Methods for Discrete-Time Duration Models," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 57(1), pages 129-38, February.
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