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A Comparison of U. S. and Canadian Consumers' Willingness to Pay for Red-Meat Traceability

Author

Listed:
  • Dickinson, David L.
  • Hobbs, Jill E.
  • Bailey, DeeVon

Abstract

Auction experiments at locations in the US and Canada are used to determine consumers' willingness to pay for red-meat traceability and other enhanced food characteristics. Consumers in both countries are found to be willing to pay a positive amount for traceability, but would pay even more if traceability were bundled with other characteristics such as animal welfare or enhanced food safety. The results suggest a larger Canadian market for traceability, on a percentage basis, for beef than in the US.

Suggested Citation

  • Dickinson, David L. & Hobbs, Jill E. & Bailey, DeeVon, 2003. "A Comparison of U. S. and Canadian Consumers' Willingness to Pay for Red-Meat Traceability," 2003 Annual meeting, July 27-30, Montreal, Canada 22060, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea03:22060
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Dickinson, David L. & Bailey, DeeVon, 2002. "Meat Traceability: Are U.S. Consumers Willing To Pay For It?," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 27(02), December.
    2. Lusk, Jayson L. & Fox, John A., 2002. "Consumer Demand For Mandatory Labeling Of Beef From Cattle Administered Growth Hormones Or Fed Genetically Modified Corn," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 34(01), April.
    3. Grannis, Jennifer L. & Hooker, Neal H. & Thilmany, Dawn D., 2000. "Consumer Preference For Specific Attributes In Natural Beef Products," 2000 Annual Meeting, June 29-July 1, 2000, Vancouver, British Columbia 36406, Western Agricultural Economics Association.
    4. Liddell, Sterling & Bailey, DeeVon, 2001. "Market Opportunities And Threats To The U.S. Pork Industry Posed By Traceability Systems," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association (IFAMA), vol. 4(03).
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    Cited by:

    1. Wu, Linhai & Wang, Shuxian & Zhu, Dian & Hu, Wuyang & Wang, Hongsha, 2015. "Chinese consumers’ preferences and willingness to pay for traceable food quality and safety attributes: The case of pork," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 121-136.
    2. Julie A. Caswell & Siny Joseph, 2007. "Consumer Demand for Quality: Major Determinant for Agricultural and Food Trade in the Future?," Working Papers 2007-4, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Resource Economics.
    3. Oyewumi, Olubukola Ayodeju & Jooste, Andre, 2006. "Measuring the determinants of pork consumption in Bloemfontein, Central South Africa," Agrekon, Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA), vol. 45(2), June.
    4. Gampl, Birgit, 2006. "Rückverfolgbarkeit von Lebensmitteln: Eine empirische Analyse kettenübergreifender Informationssysteme," I&I Working Paper 02/2006, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Department of Agricultural Economics, Section Innovation and Information.

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